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Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

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Re: Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

Post  SoloDomo on Mon Feb 01, 2016 5:41 am

Wow

I had literally zero goddamn idea.

Well thats one down the pan, I also would like to state that I can see logic in S foote'S theory on lymph drainage, what are your thoughts on that? I think it is rational and one of the best explanations we have.

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Re: Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

Post  Xenon on Mon Feb 01, 2016 7:12 am

I personally don't think the lymphatic system is much of a factor in MPB. If the scalp was suffering from lymph drainage problems, then it would cause significant swelling. I find no evidence of this in my balding areas at all. If I touch the tissue, I can feel a very thin layer of sub fat beneath, and if I press a little firmer I can feel the hard surface of the skull. Additionally, various layers of the tissue would be chronically inflamed if lymph waste was the issue. In my own situation inflammation only occurs when a stressor is present, for the rest of the time there are no problems.

Secondly, if lymphedema was chiefly responsible for MPB, then the condition would also be rampant in females, too... this isn't the case.

Thirdly, if lymph waste was the issue, then other components of the follicle would also be subject to inflammation, but they continue to function normally (sweat glands, sebaceous glands, nerves, etc). From what I've gathered only one area of the follicle is targeted for attack by immune cells, and that area is comprised of the matrix cells - the outer portion of the papilla. Even if these cells are destroyed, they are renewed via stem cell signalling anyway; they fail to renew when certain progenitors go into decline within the bulge.

Let's also consider the case of Swiss... by using certain drugs he was able to stimulate progenitor cells, block the CRTH2 receptor, and reduce DHT... consequently he regrew terminal hair pretty quickly (after being bald for many years). There's was nothing involved in his protocol to treat a faulty lymph system. This also tells us that calcification and scar tissue is a non factor in MPB. Furthermore, his remarkable regrowth shows us precisely what the problems are.

I've said previously, that follicle regeneration should be effortless for the body because they are so small, and the cells which are responsible for growing terminal hairs are microscopic. But it's generally a sequence of events initiated by the baldness gene which prevents this simple feat from happening. If that problem can be dealt with at the genetic level, then hair would start growing back very quickly.

As mentioned before, it seems to me that DHT is a potent trigger for the baldness gene. By reducing DHT it seems to partially silence expression of the baldness gene, hence regrowth in some cases.

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Re: Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

Post  Xenon on Mon Feb 01, 2016 11:38 am

Without going into overkill, I'm watching the Red Dragon movie and I noticed how much of a full head of hair actor Ralph Fiennes had compared to now. I also noticed how much of a small cranium he has, it's just that his baldness now accentuates the roundness of his skull:




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Re: Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

Post  alphadelta on Mon Feb 01, 2016 5:57 pm

interestion bit from the study

The lateral limits and the galea surface are configured as free because the aponeurotic fibers do not gain a direct insertion onto the bone and the temporal and periauricular muscles are not related to the galea because they are inserted directly into the skull.

basically means that the temporalis muscle meaning at the side of your head dont influence scalp tension.
they are directely attached to the skull on the upper end and to the jaw on the lower end.

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Re: Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

Post  SoloDomo on Tue Feb 02, 2016 3:53 am

The one thing I have witnessed in every hair loss sufferer without exception is a tight, thin scalp. I one hundred percent believe that restoration of bloodflow, relaxing of the galea and a SMALL DHT reduction will fix it

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Re: Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

Post  Xenon on Tue Feb 02, 2016 9:29 am

SoloDomo wrote:The one thing I have witnessed in every hair loss sufferer without exception is a tight, thin scalp. I one hundred percent believe that restoration of bloodflow, relaxing of the galea and a SMALL DHT reduction will fix it

Well, each to their own what they believe to be true. The only issue I have with the tight scalp theory, is that you would think that the scalp would grow and become looser in order to maintain homeostasis. As an example, some of us have larger craniums than others... as the skull bones grow, so does the scalp, and only stops growing when equilibrium is achieved. It's like when a person becomes fatter... skin tissue grows so that it wont become too tight and suffer ischemia and other potential problems. So if these principles apply to tissues located in other places, then why would the scalp be excluded from this process?

But I would agree that scalp tissue is noticeably tighter than other bodily tissues, yet whether or not it makes the scalp more prone to baldness, is another story.

P.S. OP, some think that the scalp of a balding man looks extremely tight because it usually has a shiny appearance... I also thought this too because the bald areas of my temples appeared shiny, but when I wiped the skin with some tissue it had a matt appearance - just like skin elsewhere. I then realized that this shiny appearance was caused by overproduction of sebaceous oil. And while on the subject of sebum, would the abundance of this substance throughout the scalp indicate strong blood flow? And the fact that the balding areas are usually very warm and sweat very easily (due to a significant percentage of body heat being lost there), this would also indicate that blood flow is strong.

If ischemia was the case, and the cause of follicles atrophying, then the same would happen to the sweat and sebaceous glands, as both occupy the same space as the follicle. But both glands are producing sebum and sweat normally (some may even argue abnormally high), which tells us that blood flow is likely no factor in MPB. Instead, the evidence points to one portion of the follicle being deliberately targeted by the immune system.
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