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OT: Molecular hydrogen

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OT: Molecular hydrogen

Post  CF on Mon Jul 25, 2016 11:49 pm

There are a lot of studies suggesting it has health benefits.  I am going to try it out I think.

The one thing I am wondering is, the following is the chemical reaction described at http://www.molecularhydrogenfoundation.org/core-information/how-to-get-the-benefits-of-molecular-hydrogen/ :

Magnesium metal also reacts with water to produce hydrogen gas: [Mg + 2H2O –> H2 + Mg(OH)2].  The magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH–)2) dissociates into magnesium ions (Mg2+ ) and hydroxide ions (OH-) according to the equilibrium: Mg(OH)2 <–> Mg2+ + 2OH– 24 However, the reaction is not as exothermic and thus does not carry any risk of explosion.

If metallic magnesium is added to plain water, why does the chemical reaction begin with Mg + 2H20.  Shouldn't the water just be H20?

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Re: OT: Molecular hydrogen

Post  CF on Wed Jul 27, 2016 4:02 am

I received this response from the Molecular Hydrogen Foundation:

We received your question about the reaction of magnesium
with water resulting in the production of H2 gas and magnesium
hydroxide. The reaction equation is: Mg + 2(H2O) ==> Mg(OH)2 + H2. The
number "2" in front of the H2O represents the relative number of water
molecules which will combine with each molecule of magnesium during
the reaction process (until one or both of them are consumed). These
molecular quantities are usually expressed in "moles", a unit of
measure used by chemists when describing chemical reactions. The
equation could just as easily be written: 1/2Mg + H2O ==> 1/2(Mg(OH)2)
+ 1/2H2, and the "2" would be gone, but as you can see, the relative
molar ratios of each would remain the same. I hope this explanation
helps!

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