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Supplementation For General Health (Early 30s)

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Supplementation For General Health (Early 30s)

Post  goten574 on Sun Sep 03, 2017 11:50 pm

I am male, in my early 30s. I have already noticed a difference in my body from being 30 to 20, I am aching more, I am slower, my face is developing lines. I work in a hospital (Administration on a ward) so I see a lot of people in their 70s, 80s and 90s. Severe mobility problems are common among this age range and they look so frail. I really don't want to end up like that in the future. I have seen a few people in their 90s though that look great for their age and are completely indepandant (good genes, diet and lifestyle?) My dream is to stop/greatly slow down aging but in this present day I think that is fairly unrealistic.

I want to slow down the degeneration of bones, muscles, and cartilage in my body and ensure my body is in reasonable health as long as posible. Can someone recommend supplements that are "must have" so I can try to reduce the speed of aging and maintain good health? I read a few years ago on this forum about Astaxanthin, Coenzyme Q10 and Resveratrol. Are these still "must have" supplements? I also heard about Ecklonia and Krill Oil but from memory a combination of Astaxanthin and Cod Liver Oil produces the same benefits. I don't have a lot of money and I am in the UK so would likely be buying from iHerb and having it shipped over (which will be taxed).
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goten574

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Re: Supplementation For General Health (Early 30s)

Post  imprisoned-radical on Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:53 am

goten574 wrote:I am male, in my early 30s. I have already noticed a difference in my body from being 30 to 20, I am aching more, I am slower, my face is developing lines. I work in a hospital (Administration on a ward) so I see a lot of people in their 70s, 80s and 90s. Severe mobility problems are common among this age range and they look so frail. I really don't want to end up like that in the future. I have seen a few people in their 90s though that look great for their age and are completely indepandant (good genes, diet and lifestyle?) My dream is to stop/greatly slow down aging but in this present day I think that is fairly unrealistic.

I want to slow down the degeneration of bones, muscles, and cartilage in my body and ensure my body is in reasonable health as long as posible. Can someone recommend supplements that are "must have" so I can try to reduce the speed of aging and maintain good health? I read a few years ago on this forum about Astaxanthin, Coenzyme Q10 and Resveratrol. Are these still "must have" supplements? I also heard about Ecklonia and Krill Oil but from memory a combination of Astaxanthin and Cod Liver Oil produces the same benefits. I don't have a lot of money and I am in the UK so would likely be buying from iHerb and having it shipped over (which will be taxed).

I'm in a similar situation, in my late 20s now and there is a noticeable difference from several years ago. Growth hormone and testosterone levels decrease during the late 20s, so maintaining those levels is the primary goal. This website has lots of useful information:
http://ergo-log.com/

So far, this is what has helped for me:

1. Eat more red onions and broccoli. This will increase your testosterone levels, and it's cheap.
2. Limit added sugar. Probably varies on an individual basis.
3. I take curcumin and resveratrol. This combination used to work much better for me than it does now. Need to figure out why it is not as effective as before, maybe the dosage needs to be increased.
4. Avoid ejaculating. I know this is a controversial topic and it may vary on an individual basis, but it has helped me.
5. Be aware of social stress. To quote an article from Ray Peat, "Social subordination in animals often involves high estrogen and reduced fertility".


Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2007 Nov;293(5):R1864-74. Epub 2007 Sep 12.
Social stress and recovery: implications for body weight and body composition.
Tamashiro KL, Nguyen MM, Ostrander MM, Gardner SR, Ma LY, Woods SC, Sakai RR.
Social stress resulting from dominant-subordinate relationships is associated with body weight loss and altered body composition in subordinate (SUB) male rats. Here, we extend these findings to determine whether stress-induced changes in energy homeostasis persist when the social stress is removed, and the animal is allowed to recover. We examined body weight (BW), body composition, and relevant endocrine measures after one or two cycles of 14 days of social stress, each followed by 21 days of recovery in each ratís individual home cage. SUB lost significantly more BW during social housing in a visible burrow system (VBS) compared with dominant (DOM) animals. Weight loss during social stress was attributable to a decrease in adipose tissue in DOM and SUB, with an additional loss of lean tissue in SUB. During both 21-day recovery periods, DOM and SUB regained lost BW, but only SUB were hyperphagic. Following recovery, SUB had a relatively larger increase in adipose tissue and plasma leptin compared with DOM, indicating that body composition changes were dependent on social status. Control animals that were weight matched to SUB or male rats exposed to the VBS environment without females, and that did not form a social hierarchy, did not exhibit changes in body composition like SUB in the VBS. Therefore, chronic social stress causes social status-dependent changes in BW, composition and endocrine measures that persist after repeated stress and recovery cycles and that may ultimately lead to metabolic disorders and obesity.

Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2013 Sep 2. pii: S0306-4530(13)00287-4. doi: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2013.07.022. [Epub ahead of print]
Psychosocial stress induces hyperphagia and exacerbates diet-induced insulin resistance and the manifestations of the Metabolic Syndrome.
Sanghez V, Razzoli M, Carobbio S, Campbell M, McCallum J, Cero C, Ceresini G, Cabassi A, Govoni P, Franceschini P, de Santis V, Gurney A, Ninkovic I, Parmigiani S, Palanza P, Vidal-Puig A, Bartolomucci A.
Stress and hypercaloric food are recognized risk factors for obesity, Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). Given the complexity of these metabolic processes and the unavailability of animal models, there is poor understanding of their underlying mechanisms. We established a model of chronic psychosocial stress in which subordinate mice are vulnerable to weight gain while dominant mice are resilient. Subordinate mice fed a standard diet showed marked hyperphagia, high leptin, low adiponectin, and dyslipidemia. Despite these molecular signatures of MetS and T2D, subordinate mice fed a standard diet were still euglycemic. We hypothesized that stress predisposes subordinate mice to develop T2D when synergizing with other risk factors. High fat diet aggravated dyslipidemia and the MetS thus causing a pre-diabetes-like state in subordinate mice. Contrary to subordinates, dominant mice were fully protected from stress-induced metabolic disorders when fed both a standard- and a high fat-diet. Dominant mice showed a hyperphagic response that was similar to subordinate but, unlike subordinates, showed a significant increase in VO2, VCO2, and respiratory exchange ratio when compared to control mice. Overall, we demonstrated a robust stress- and social status-dependent effect on the development of MetS and T2D and provided insights on the physiological mechanisms. Our results are reminiscent of the effect of the individual socioeconomic status on human health and provide an animal model to study the underlying molecular mechanisms.

It's been my observation that most people, beginning in their 20s, start to play a "social dominance" game. People start evaluating one another based on various metrics of social status: wealth, income, popularity, etc. and try to one-up their competitors. I think this behavior is programmed by evolution, and to some extent it is beneficial but when left unchecked it can lead to behavior that is destructive both to oneself and others. On the one hand, winning and having the desire to win is natural and everyone should pursue it. But in the long term, people with "type A personality" don't necessarily fare better in life than type B.

The cure is to change your outlook on life. Having a close circle of family and friends has helped me.

imprisoned-radical

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