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The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

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The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Xenon on Fri Mar 30, 2018 12:30 am

Here's a trans guy who - at the time - had been taking T for 7 years, and started balding. In many of these balding FTM cases I've studied, they always mention T causing itchiness and prickly heat throughout the scalp (histamine and inflammatory cascade).

It's still a total mystery as to why T causes an enhanced inflammatory response within these follicles (but not in every man). Whatever the exact underlying mechanism, these follicles release chemokines which basically makes them become a target for immune attack. Chemokines are generally released by damaged tissue, so it's anyone's guess why T causes damage to these follicles in particular.

Perhaps MPB is a natural (albeit fucking horrible) secondary sex characteristic, and T activates genes for this characteristic to be expressed. As I previously mentioned - some guys have the genes for, say, a very hairy chest, whereas some men don't produce any or very little chest hair. I guess it is all largely down to genetics, and T being the primary activator. Yet, in the case of MPB this secondary sex characteristic is dependent upon the inflammatory cascade to cause hair miniaturization, and there are various ways to prevent inflammation. The only problem I foresee, unless balding genes can be deactivated, then the battle with inflammation will be a lifelong battle.          

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  CausticSymmetry on Fri Mar 30, 2018 8:56 am

Trigger yes, but actual cause, no.

Testosterone injections for example can induce hyperplasia of the prostate within weeks. However, this effect can be prevented.

Testosterone and/or androgens amplify the toxic effect of existing inflammatory mediators such as chemokines, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, etc.




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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Xenon on Fri Mar 30, 2018 1:35 pm

Testosterone and/or androgens amplify the toxic effect of existing inflammatory mediators such as chemokines, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, etc.

So, by this, you mean that there was already pre-existing, yet low grade inflammation throughout scalp tissue, but androgens made things much worse? This is a fairly interesting perspective because I know, without a shadow of a doubt, that excessive combing, etc, contributed heavily to my hairloss, and I'd been combing my hair every day since I was a boy (in the areas that thinned out). But inflammatory issues were never apparent until I hit adolescence. So, perhaps you have a point - maybe other factors first laid down the groundwork, and androgens simply amplified them.
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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Hairbeback on Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:27 pm

Native Americans come their hair, they have some of the most beautiful strong hair you will see generally speaking

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  CausticSymmetry on Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:31 pm

Xenon wrote:
Testosterone and/or androgens amplify the toxic effect of existing inflammatory mediators such as chemokines, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, etc.

So, by this, you mean that there was already pre-existing, yet low grade inflammation throughout scalp tissue, but androgens made things much worse? This is an interesting perspective because I know, without a shadow of a doubt, that excessive combing (and other factors) contributed heavily to my hairloss, and I'd been combing my hair every day since I was a boy (in the areas that thinned out). But the inflammatory issues were never so apparent than when I hit adolescence and began producing androgens.  

Yes exactly, already existing low-grade inflammation. Unfortunately, I could probably fill up pages of different causes, because of all the environmental toxins, many are overlooked. Plus there are often anatomical derangement's that are extremely common, because of the western diet and what doctors and dentists do as "standard of care."

I'll mention just a few:

Cooking indoors using oils will decrease human lifespan about approximately ten years. How does that relate to hair loss? Inflammatory prostaglandins.

Air pollution from industry and city traffic. It's been studied and yes, it absolutely affects hair in a big way.

Various heavy metals (think dentists, water sources, food, petroleum and vaccinations). If anyone had any idea just how pernicious these were, the subject of DHT (which not be such a big deal).

Off-gassing from various sources = volatile organic compounds (VOC's)

Various endocrine disruptors (phthalates, non-stick coatings, gender bender molecules, estrogen-like mimics)

Unintact gut mucosa - It's becoming more the "norm" for people to have compromised gut integrity. Why? Vaccination
contains adjuvants that can perturb the gut wall and create immune dysfunction.

The estrogen-like molecules can alter the thymus gland, which can provoke regulatory T cells (called Treg cells). These can develop in the thymus and in peripheral tissues. Peripheral Tregs differentiate from naïve CD4+ T cells in peripheral tissues following activation from antigen encounter in the presence of TGF-Beta, and in the absence of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-4. Ultimately, this can create an autoimmune scenario, causing a persistent inflammatory response.

That's just the tip of the iceberg, so no doubt T will trigger hair loss, but without the activators, it will do nothing.
This partially explains why in general those men without MPB on average have higher T levels. Inflammation causes T levels to lower. The body will naturally increase 5-alpha reductase to attempt to compensate.

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Xenon on Fri Mar 30, 2018 3:47 pm

Hairbeback wrote:Native Americans come their hair, they have some of the most beautiful strong hair you will see generally speaking

Traction alopecia can occur through excess combing. The hair grows from the papilla, and when the hair is pulled tightly, so is the papilla, and this causes the papilla to break away from the capillary loop. Also, the teeth of the comb cause friction and inflammatory issues to the tissue. This generally doesn't happen with long hair because it is more loose and flexible due to increased length, so it is harder to pull it tighter from the papilla (unless it has been tied back in tight braids for a considerable length of time).  

^^Also, it depends upon the comb or brush. If the teeth are tightly packed together, then this is going to have a harder grip and pull on the hair, whereas if there is generous space between each tooth, then there will be less grip and pull on the hair.

Secondly, MPB is reported to be very uncommon among native Americans.
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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Xenon on Fri Mar 30, 2018 5:33 pm

CS, let's remove the androgen element from hair loss and focus upon the pre-existent low grade inflammation - for a moment. I can't verify if what you have said is entirely correct because I only became aware of scalp (or more aptly temple inflammation) in my mid teens. But assuming you are right, then why - in your opinion - was this tissue in particular already subject to low grade inflammation? What is it about this tissue in MPB subjects that becomes a target for immune attack? Do you think this is where the genetic aspect fits into the picture? For instance, we have asthma sufferers who's bronchial airways are subject to immune attack when allergens are present. The general explanation given for this, is that the condition is genetic (if present from infancy). So, do you think that scalp follicles were genetically predetermined to follow a similar pathophysiology? OR could it be persistent extraneous insults such as excessive combing / mechanical force, etc, setting the stage for low grade inflammatory problems, which become worse when androgens make their mark?

Also, I remember seeing the front page of a local newspaper, and it featured a photo of school children, around the age of 9 or 10. What shocked me was seeing this particular boy who had a very advanced receded hairline - worse than most men I know. This sure threw me for a loop because I was convinced that androgens had to be in effect for MPB be to be expressed. So, maybe this particular case backs up your point.
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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Hairbeback on Fri Mar 30, 2018 5:48 pm

MPB is a term used to describe "hair loss" which is a false premise cause you are not actually losing hair. Native Americans take very good care of their hair, its important to them in their tradition. They use various oils and don't use commercial shampoos, they only wash their hair once a week naturally. And do they comb their hair.....combing your hair keeps your hair healthy, it doesn't have to be abrasive or excessive. Native people also massage their head (generally speaking) every day. The whole "Natives have less MPB" is a false premise

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Xenon on Fri Mar 30, 2018 6:51 pm

Hairbeback wrote:MPB is a term used to describe "hair loss" which is a false premise cause you are not actually losing hair. Native Americans take very good care of their hair, its important to them in their tradition. They use various oils and don't use commercial shampoos, they only wash their hair once a week naturally. And do they comb their hair.....combing your hair keeps your hair healthy, it doesn't have to be abrasive or excessive. Native people also massage their head (generally speaking) every day. The whole "Natives have less MPB" is a false premise

We'll probably enter into a flame war here (nothing new with me and you), but have you not completely contradicted yourself with each point you've made?

1. You say MPB sufferers don't lose hair. I think the majority of board members on here would disagree with such an absurd statement. They are here because they are losing their hair and looking for a viable solution for it. If they weren't losing their hair, they simply wouldn't be here. And, even more bizarre, you already told us you lost 80% of your hair over 12 years, so what the hell are you talking about?

2. You go into detail as to why natives have very healthy hair... combing, massaging, etc, and then tell me that it's a myth that natives lose their hair less compared to other ethnicities. So, err, combing, massaging, magical oils, etc, can't be doing them much good if they lose their hair at the same rate as anyone else.

What you say is completely nonsensical, but then you are and always have been full of shit, hence the reason why you lost all of your hair.

Just keep eating your Kerrygold moon cheese, and do the magic twirl thing with your boar brush if you think it will bring back 80% of what you have lost.

P.S. I wont be drawn into another flame war with you, I'll just continue to ignore you as I previously did, and let you eat your moon cheese in peace.

Your ludicrous perspective on things is a complete waste of time to read (despite being hilarious). You have to be trolling with the shit you spew, man. I've read some garbage being bandied about from time to time, but you seriously take the cake.
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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  CausticSymmetry on Sat Mar 31, 2018 3:11 am

Hi Xenon, I've studied medicine for a longtime and part of this is to also understand the history of various afflictions.

Today many adults and children suffer from various dis-eases that were relatively rare 40 years ago. These once rare conditions are now extremely pervasive to the point where they are assumed to be normal.

There is no true genetic component to them. Frequently, there are genes associated with certain conditions, however they are damaged genes because of environmental impact, so instead of the body cleaning itself, the gene is too dysfunctional to work at capacity so then one will fall prey to a dis-ease, which is due to the present environment.

Most autoimmune conditions are triggered by vaccinations, and it can take decades for this to happen. It helps that other toxins in the environment, including the artificial foods we eat are present. https://vaccinesafetycommission.org/studies.html

When I was a kid, it was quite uncommon to know anyone with asthma, eczema, food allergies, etc.

The above examples are somewhat hormone related, as a common trigger is cow products, particularly pasteurized milk and cheese.

Other examples could be other foods, some of which were never a problem in the past, because the foods were organic and not adulterated with herbicides, pesticides, etc.

The soils for which the food is grown upon is bankrupt in nutrients that help stabilize mast cell disorders. It's now common for people to have problems with mast cells and other histamine reactions (which are major sources of inflammation).

Civilized countries had bought into artificial fat consumption for many decades, purely on the assumption that the science was 'settled' that saturated fats were "bad" for us, so we substituted margarine and other forms of hydrogen pumped, polyunsaturated fatty acids into our diet. That alters hormones and reduces oxygen transfer into the cell membrane (creates inflammation).

Also the countries bought into the idea of "healthy" oils, which are closer to toxic waste, such as canola and cottonseed oil. This is really nothing new for this forum, however most people consume these types of oils which are very cheap to produce but have a toxic effect on the body. They will take whatever other toxin and elevate its effect to a worse level.

Beyond some of what I mentioned about food and environmental toxins, there is another factor which to me explains why finding the genetic rationale for MPB so difficult. That is the anatomical changes that occur during developmental stages prior to adolescence.

95% people men and women in today's world have mandibular malocclusion. In other words, an imperfect mandibular structure.

Take a look at Figure 52 here:

https://healthwyze.org/archive/nutrition_and_physical_degeneration_doctor_weston_a_price.pdf

You'll notice 2 things. No hair loss and perfect teeth. You can read other examples of pre-civilized food and post effects on different cultures.

You might be wondering, what does mandibular malocclusion have to do with hair? Quite a lot, because it has been known for a long time (at least in the medical literature) that toxic blood (better known today as inflammatory cytokines) cause hair loss to occur. The effects of some anatomical malformations, such as an imperfect mandibular structure will change the arteries that effect the scalp.

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Directo on Sat Mar 31, 2018 3:00 pm

Xenon wrote:In many of these balding FTM cases I've studied,
Can you show us other examples of these cases (photos or videos). Interested in seeing how bad too it can become. Thanks.

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  long hair on Sat Mar 31, 2018 9:07 pm

from the pdf:

It is of interest that in October, 1935, Professor Hale reports that the
Texas Agricultural Experiment Station was informed that a litter of
fourteen pigs had been born blind in June, 1935, on a farm at Ralls,
Texas. Of these, six pigs were raised and brought to the Station for
further study. The farmer owning the pigs stated that no green feed was
available on his farm from March, 1934, until May, 1935. It will be
noted that this condition paralleled the experimental conditions at the
station under which by restricting vitamin A before and immediately
after gestation fifty-nine pigs were produced without eyeballs.
so this is just an example of how green food and vitamins can affect our life Shocked
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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Xenon on Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:46 am

Directo wrote:
Xenon wrote:In many of these balding FTM cases I've studied,
Can you show us other examples of these cases (photos or videos). Interested in seeing how bad too it can become. Thanks.

Directo, these were not the cases I previously came across, but you're interested in me providing more evidence of hairloss in trans guys, I take it? Here's just a few for you from YT, but if you YT / Google search "FTM baldness", there are many more vids, not to mention so much literature, that it would take me all day to post even a fraction of it on here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViRz4rlE3dI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CIwo3XAaWUQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNxEKex_LGA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQfWqFs0dfI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DjvT6TxZQe0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T33zQFS8r4U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5MM_kNh_Go

ETA: despite me being accused of resorting to anecdotes, I have mentioned time and again how heavy exercise causes my hair to thin like no man's business. This could be because T levels increase during exercise and leads to an inflammatory cascade, or amplifies pre-existing low grade inflammation (as CS mentioned in a previous post in the thread). How I personally prevented this inflammatory cascade was by applying lots of cold water to my scalp. This leads to temporary vasoconstriction of capillaries, and prevents extravasation of neutrophils aka white blood cells leaking into surrounding tissues.
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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  CausticSymmetry on Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:12 pm

Xenon - With respect to the prickly heat sensation you described earlier, there is research that vouches for you possibly being low on vitamin D. If you reside in the UK, then this is probably very likely the case.

A classic symptom of low vitamin D is a sweaty head.

The first two study links listed below relate to histamine and vitamin D

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4154631/

http://pubs.sciepub.com/jfnr/4/1/6/

Vitamin D's role in hair cycling

https://escholarship.org/uc/item/8s34p6b7




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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Xenon on Sun Apr 01, 2018 6:18 pm

Cheers, CS. I recall the former board member Anthony Spencer delving into this topic quite heavily. He theorized that hair of the head is lost so that more skin can be exposed to sunlight, and consequently produce more vit D to stave off prostate cancer.

Now, interestingly enough, when I used to work nights, this was when inflammation always seemed to flare up. However, I don't know if fully related to absence of sunlight because I remember always feeling tired when I'd experience a flare up throughout my temples, so I naturally assumed that sleep deprivation was the sole cause. My way of remedying this was pretty much laying back in my reclining chair and having mini naps - where possible. For some reason, I found that these mini naps - while laying back - had a strong anti-inflammatory effect. Yet, perhaps, lack of sunlight works in synergy with sleep deprivation to make inflammatory problems worse. In light of things it would make sense because when I worked days, I never had these issues at all.

To pretty much sum things up, I've found that prolonged stress of any kind leads to a flare up throughout the temples, and in more extreme circumstances - the entire galea. Many years of personal observations and research led me to such a conclusion, but it was extremely baffling along the way. On one level I'd find that a hypoxic environment led to a flare up, so assumed it was entirely oxygen related, then I'd find a low carb / keto diet, gluten / grains, grueling exercise, sleep deprivation, etc, etc, all caused an inflammatory episode.

I can only fathom that these cells are in a highly immunoreactive state due to various factors -- androgen being one of them. This is why I began to wonder if MPB (or more aptly - inflammation of scalp) was some sort of early warning system to inform us that we are under stress and need to deal with these issues before they develop into irreversible health problems.

Perhaps.
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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  CausticSymmetry on Mon Apr 02, 2018 3:02 am

Xenon wrote:Cheers, CS. I recall the former board member Anthony Spencer delving into this topic quite heavily. He theorized that hair of the head is lost so that more skin can be exposed to sunlight, and consequently produce more vit D to stave off prostate cancer.

Now, interestingly enough, when I used to work nights, this was when inflammation always seemed to flare up. However, I don't know if fully related to absence of sunlight because I remember always feeling tired when I'd experience a flare up throughout my temples, so I naturally assumed that sleep deprivation was the sole cause. My way of remedying this was pretty much laying back in my reclining chair and having mini naps - where possible. For some reason, I found that these mini naps - while laying back - had a strong anti-inflammatory effect. Yet, perhaps, lack of sunlight works in synergy with sleep deprivation to make inflammatory problems worse. In light of things it would make sense because when I worked days, I never had these issues at all.

To pretty much sum things up, I've found that prolonged stress of any kind leads to a flare up throughout the temples, and in more extreme circumstances - the entire galea. Many years of personal observations and research led me to such a conclusion, but it was extremely baffling along the way. On one level I'd find that a hypoxic environment led to a flare up, so assumed it was entirely oxygen related, then I'd find a low carb / keto diet, gluten / grains, grueling exercise, sleep deprivation, etc, etc, all caused an inflammatory episode.

I can only fathom that these cells are in a highly immunoreactive state due to various factors -- androgen being one of them. This is why I began to wonder if MPB (or more aptly - inflammation of scalp) was some sort of early warning system to inform us that we are under stress and need to deal with these issues before they develop into irreversible health problems.

Perhaps.

Plenty more info on Vitamin D: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5751255/

Seems to me that in your case working at night (generally bad for hair---anything that alters normal circadian rhythms) and stresses, that can bring on hypothalamic neuronal histamine. This causes disturbances in the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis. More about this here:

https://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/physrev.00043.2007

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  thissucks on Mon Apr 02, 2018 8:07 am

CausticSymmetry wrote:
Xenon wrote:
Testosterone and/or androgens amplify the toxic effect of existing inflammatory mediators such as chemokines, leukotrienes, prostaglandins, etc.

So, by this, you mean that there was already pre-existing, yet low grade inflammation throughout scalp tissue, but androgens made things much worse? This is an interesting perspective because I know, without a shadow of a doubt, that excessive combing (and other factors) contributed heavily to my hairloss, and I'd been combing my hair every day since I was a boy (in the areas that thinned out). But the inflammatory issues were never so apparent than when I hit adolescence and began producing androgens.  

Yes exactly, already existing low-grade inflammation. Unfortunately, I could probably fill up pages of different causes, because of all the environmental toxins, many are overlooked. Plus there are often anatomical derangement's that are extremely common, because of the western diet and what doctors and dentists do as "standard of care."

I'll mention just a few:

Cooking indoors using oils will decrease human lifespan about approximately ten years. How does that relate to hair loss? Inflammatory prostaglandins.

Air pollution from industry and city traffic. It's been studied and yes, it absolutely affects hair in a big way.

Various heavy metals (think dentists, water sources, food, petroleum and vaccinations). If anyone had any idea just how pernicious these were, the subject of DHT (which not be such a big deal).

Off-gassing from various sources = volatile organic compounds (VOC's)

Various endocrine disruptors (phthalates, non-stick coatings, gender bender molecules, estrogen-like mimics)

Unintact gut mucosa - It's becoming more the "norm" for people to have compromised gut integrity. Why? Vaccination
contains adjuvants that can perturb the gut wall and create immune dysfunction.

The estrogen-like molecules can alter the thymus gland, which can provoke regulatory T cells (called Treg cells). These can develop in the thymus and in peripheral tissues. Peripheral Tregs differentiate from naïve CD4+ T cells in peripheral tissues following activation from antigen encounter in the presence of TGF-Beta, and in the absence of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-4. Ultimately, this can create an autoimmune scenario, causing a persistent inflammatory response.

That's just the tip of the iceberg, so no doubt T will trigger hair loss, but without theG activators, it will do nothing.
This partially explains why in general those men without MPB on average have higher T levels. Inflammation causes T levels to lower. The body will naturally increase 5-alpha reductase to attempt to compensate.
Great post, CS.  Let me ask you a little more about the points above.

1.)  Does the cooking concern include healthy oils, i.e. coconut, avocado, olive, etc.?
2.)  Is there anything that can be done about the negative effects air pollution?  Does washing or rinsing the scalp off more frequently help?
3.)  What else can we do about heavy metals besides remove metal fillings, avoid vaccines, and take Immune Boost 77 (humic acid)?

All scary stuff.  We live in such a toxic world.  I feel like we're helpless in so many ways.  There's also electronics and e-radiation.

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  CausticSymmetry on Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:09 am

Xenon - Adding to my previous mention about Vitamin D. I posted something a few months back, that probably got overlooked. This is one of the few studies I've looked at that shows a "genetic relationship" in male pattern balding. However, I consider it to be more epigenetic than a purely genetic link.

Unlike before, I will post the full study instead of the abstract, which was published in the British Journal of Dermatology, "Study of gene expression alteration in male androgenetic alopecia: evidence of predominant molecular signalling pathways."

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/bjd.15577

1-alpha-hydroxylase is an enzyme that is significantly reduced in a population of people with MPB. This enzyme is necessary to synthesize vitamin D. This is to the tune of 86%. While vitamin D alone isn't the whole answer, without it, a lot of co-dependents will be useless, such as disulfide bonding and glutathione S-transferase. Without that, hair is pretty much toast.

Also the gene affected, CYP27B1 normally protects against radiation-induced alopecia.


Last edited by CausticSymmetry on Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:26 am; edited 2 times in total

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  CausticSymmetry on Tue Apr 03, 2018 7:18 am

thissucks - I put the answers in bold

1.)  Does the cooking concern include healthy oils, i.e. coconut, avocado, olive, etc.?

No, these are good. For cooking opt for non-extra virgin olive oil. For cold food, use EVO

2.)  Is there anything that can be done about the negative effects air pollution?  Does washing or rinsing the scalp off more frequently help?

Check out the answer for number 3 on that one. Not sure about washing or rinsing off the scalp, what happens internally seems to determine how that plays out.

3.)  What else can we do about heavy metals besides remove metal fillings, avoid vaccines, and take Immune Boost 77 (humic acid)?

I think that's a critical question, unfortunately it depends and how to deal with that depends on a lot of different individual factors. In other words, what is a good idea for some people would be a disaster for others. This is because of the type of chelators that some people may require (or not require). The protocol is far from simple.

Having said that, indoor pollution is a threat as well. The most basic answer that's safe is to boost sulfur intake and its co-factors. Nrf2 supplements.

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Xenon on Tue Apr 03, 2018 11:12 pm

CausticSymmetry wrote:Xenon - Adding to my previous mention about Vitamin D. I posted something a few months back, that probably got overlooked. This is one of the few studies I've looked at that shows a "genetic relationship" in male pattern balding. However, I consider it to be more epigenetic than a purely genetic link.

Unlike before, I will post the full study instead of the abstract, which was published in the British Journal of Dermatology, "Study of gene expression alteration in male androgenetic alopecia: evidence of predominant molecular signalling pathways."

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/bjd.15577

1-alpha-hydroxylase is an enzyme that is significantly reduced in a population of people with MPB. This enzyme is necessary to synthesize vitamin D. This is to the tune of 86%. While vitamin D alone isn't the whole answer, without it, a lot of co-dependents will be useless, such as disulfide bonding and glutathione S-transferase. Without that, hair is pretty much toast.

Also the gene affected, CYP27B1 normally protects against radiation-induced alopecia.

Thanks again for info, CS - that study was one of the best I've read.

Also, one of the reasons why I have hardly been posting anything in recent times is because I've been experiencing some very positive results in regards to temple growth (started experiment Jan 13th), but I've been keeping my "regimen" under firm wraps because of a certain lurker and parasite on here who steals everyone's research, claims it as his own, and makes a handsome profit from it all. And, of course, there are many on here who do nothing but give me an endless stream of abuse, and that's another reason why I'm giving nothing away to anyone.

I'll leave them to do what I did and do some intensive study every day for 19 years, and perhaps then they might have something to show for it all.

Either way, good luck to all.




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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  Bs1224 on Sat Apr 07, 2018 1:08 am

Xenon wrote:
CausticSymmetry wrote:Xenon - Adding to my previous mention about Vitamin D. I posted something a few months back, that probably got overlooked. This is one of the few studies I've looked at that shows a "genetic relationship" in male pattern balding. However, I consider it to be more epigenetic than a purely genetic link.

Unlike before, I will post the full study instead of the abstract, which was published in the British Journal of Dermatology, "Study of gene expression alteration in male androgenetic alopecia: evidence of predominant molecular signalling pathways."

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/bjd.15577

1-alpha-hydroxylase is an enzyme that is significantly reduced in a population of people with MPB. This enzyme is necessary to synthesize vitamin D. This is to the tune of 86%. While vitamin D alone isn't the whole answer, without it, a lot of co-dependents will be useless, such as disulfide bonding and glutathione S-transferase. Without that, hair is pretty much toast.

Also the gene affected, CYP27B1 normally protects against radiation-induced alopecia.

Thanks again for info, CS - that study was one of the best I've read.

Also, one of the reasons why I have hardly been posting anything in recent times is because I've been experiencing some very positive results in regards to temple growth (started experiment Jan 13th), but I've been keeping my "regimen" under firm wraps because of a certain lurker and parasite on here who steals everyone's research, claims it as his own, and makes a handsome profit from it all. And, of course, there are many on here who do nothing but give me an endless stream of abuse, and that's another reason why I'm giving nothing away to anyone.

I'll leave them to do what I did and do some intensive study every day for 19 years, and perhaps then they might have something to show for it all.

Either way, good luck to all.

 



I do understand your frustration with people stealing your hard work and criticizing your research. But like me there are people that value the hard work you and others have put into this. I really hope you reconsider sharing valuable information. Just trying to save my hair before it’s too late. Thank you and good luck to you

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  thissucks on Tue Apr 10, 2018 3:43 pm

CausticSymmetry wrote:thissucks - I put the answers in bold

1.)  Does the cooking concern include healthy oils, i.e. coconut, avocado, olive, etc.?

No, these are good. For cooking opt for non-extra virgin olive oil. For cold food, use EVO

2.)  Is there anything that can be done about the negative effects air pollution?  Does washing or rinsing the scalp off more frequently help?

Check out the answer for number 3 on that one. Not sure about washing or rinsing off the scalp, what happens internally seems to determine how that plays out.

3.)  What else can we do about heavy metals besides remove metal fillings, avoid vaccines, and take Immune Boost 77 (humic acid)?

I think that's a critical question, unfortunately it depends and how to deal with that depends on a lot of different individual factors. In other words, what is a good idea for some people would be a disaster for others. This is because of the type of chelators that some people may require (or not require). The protocol is far from simple.

Having said that, indoor pollution is a threat as well. The most basic answer that's safe is to boost sulfur intake and its co-factors. Nrf2 supplements.
Thanks CS. I thought coconut and avocado were better for cooking, since they have higher smoke points.

Also, I've never heard of Nrf2 until now. Another supplement to add to the list?

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  thissucks on Tue Apr 10, 2018 4:00 pm

CausticSymmetry wrote:Hi Xenon, I've studied medicine for a longtime and part of this is to also understand the history of various afflictions.

Today many adults and children suffer from various dis-eases that were relatively rare 40 years ago. These once rare conditions are now extremely pervasive to the point where they are assumed to be normal.

There is no true genetic component to them. Frequently, there are genes associated with certain conditions, however they are damaged genes because of environmental impact, so instead of the body cleaning itself, the gene is too dysfunctional to work at capacity so then one will fall prey to a dis-ease, which is due to the present environment.

Most autoimmune conditions are triggered by vaccinations, and it can take decades for this to happen. It helps that other toxins in the environment, including the artificial foods we eat are present. https://vaccinesafetycommission.org/studies.html

When I was a kid, it was quite uncommon to know anyone with asthma, eczema, food allergies, etc.

The above examples are somewhat hormone related, as a common trigger is cow products, particularly pasteurized milk and cheese.

Other examples could be other foods, some of which were never a problem in the past, because the foods were organic and not adulterated with herbicides, pesticides, etc.

The soils for which the food is grown upon is bankrupt in nutrients that help stabilize mast cell disorders. It's now common for people to have problems with mast cells and other histamine reactions (which are major sources of inflammation).

Civilized countries had bought into artificial fat consumption for many decades, purely on the assumption that the science was 'settled' that saturated fats were "bad" for us, so we substituted margarine and other forms of hydrogen pumped, polyunsaturated fatty acids into our diet. That alters hormones and reduces oxygen transfer into the cell membrane (creates inflammation).

Also the countries bought into the idea of "healthy" oils, which are closer to toxic waste, such as canola and cottonseed oil. This is really nothing new for this forum, however most people consume these types of oils which are very cheap to produce but have a toxic effect on the body. They will take whatever other toxin and elevate its effect to a worse level.

Beyond some of what I mentioned about food and environmental toxins, there is another factor which to me explains why finding the genetic rationale for MPB so difficult. That is the anatomical changes that occur during developmental stages prior to adolescence.

95% people men and women in today's world have mandibular malocclusion. In other words, an imperfect mandibular structure.

Take a look at Figure 52 here:

https://healthwyze.org/archive/nutrition_and_physical_degeneration_doctor_weston_a_price.pdf

You'll notice 2 things. No hair loss and perfect teeth. You can read other examples of pre-civilized food and post effects on different cultures.

You might be wondering, what does mandibular malocclusion have to do with hair? Quite a lot, because it has been known for a long time (at least in the medical literature) that toxic blood (better known today as inflammatory cytokines) cause hair loss to occur. The effects of some anatomical malformations, such as an imperfect mandibular structure will change the arteries that effect the scalp.
Very interesting point about mandibular malocclusion, CS. I am sure I have this. My bite is all out of alignment, it looks terrible. What can be done about this?

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Re: The smoking gun T is the primary MPB trigger

Post  CausticSymmetry on Fri Apr 13, 2018 3:04 am

Hi thissucks, it's an evolving question and the potential solutions depend on the classification. There are the 3 class types of malocclusion.

Here's more info.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27319035

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9-Yh1g1xwE

This is just the one small area and there's much more to this.



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