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Manganese deficiency and hair loss

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Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  Paradox on Sun May 02, 2010 10:16 am

I thought this was interesting:

Mineral metabolism of 19 patients with hair loss was examined. The analysis showed manganese deficiency in all 19. Eighteen patients showed considerable problems with calcium absorption, and twelve patients had problems with their zinc metabolism. Specific nutritional and mineral therapy resulted in improved hair growth after 2-3 months of treatment. [Blaurock-Busch, E. Wichtige Nahrstoffe fur Gesunde Haut und Haare, Kosmetik Internat. 3/87]

Zinc depletes manganese, so if you are using high amounts of zinc you should make sure to get manganese.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  gonzalito on Sun May 02, 2010 4:12 pm

Very interesting Exclamation

What would be the recommended minimum dose for taking manganese in the form of supplements?

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  ubraj on Sun May 02, 2010 6:09 pm

When Ted from Bangkok at earthclinic.com mentioned manganese to fight hair loss I tried it with no luck years ago. Zinc has been shown low in several studies posted in this forum. IMO, the real question is why are we not absorbing the zinc and manganese from our food. IMO, gluten sensitivity in most and in some also oxalates binding to zinc and/or manganese.

So again, IMO, the zinc and manganese and other deficiencies found in hair loss are more of an indicator of what's going on in our stomach than an actual direct cause of hair loss.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  gonzalito on Sun May 02, 2010 6:56 pm

jdp701,

And what dosage did you try by then?

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  Paradox on Sun May 02, 2010 7:13 pm

gonzalito wrote:Very interesting Exclamation

What would be the recommended minimum dose for taking manganese in the form of supplements?

I'm not sure what the minimum dose would be, but I personally am taking 10mg/day because I'm using 100mg+ zinc and 200mg b6 (p5p). These doses are much higher than average.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  Paradox on Sun May 02, 2010 7:18 pm

jdp701 wrote:When Ted from Bangkok at earthclinic.com mentioned manganese to fight hair loss I tried it with no luck years ago. Zinc has been shown low in several studies posted in this forum. IMO, the real question is why are we not absorbing the zinc and manganese from our food. IMO, gluten sensitivity in most and in some also oxalates binding to zinc and/or manganese.

So again, IMO, the zinc and manganese and other deficiencies found in hair loss are more of an indicator of what's going on in our stomach than an actual direct cause of hair loss.

I think you may be right jdp. I've read that hypothesis elsewhere as well. Theoretically one could lower the dosing of deficient minerals over time as absorption improves after quitting gluten and/or other foods they react to.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  Paradox on Sun May 02, 2010 7:20 pm

jdp,

were you taking zinc with the manganese to avoid depleting it? Did others experience anything positive from manganese?

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  ubraj on Sun May 02, 2010 7:20 pm

gonalito,

I took this one .... I believe one per day http://www.iherb.com/Twinlab-Manganese-10-mg-100-Capsules/2383?at=0

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  ubraj on Sun May 02, 2010 7:39 pm

Paradox,

I've heard a couple others mention wanting to try manganese at regrowth previously but not sure if they ever did or how it went. Also, I'm not sure I've seen anyone mention positive results at earthclinic beyond what Ted at Bangkok has mentioned.

I personally believe manganese is a dead end. Supplemental zinc however is beneficial and even more beneficial once going off gluten. What I mean is it felt that zinc wasn't being absorbed until my change in diet. Possibly the reason for it was oxalates were binding to zinc not to mention leaky gut due to gluten.

I'm not sure if I took zinc and manganese at the same time. My guess is probably not.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  ubraj on Sun May 02, 2010 8:01 pm

Paradox,

This is a bit off-topic but is similiar to what we were discussing via PM a short while ago. I thought you'd be interested.


--------------------------------------------------------------------


EXCESS IRON INCREASES OTHER METALS Excess iron can cause other metals such
as copper, calcium and manganese to accumulate in the body by binding with them,
and they become deposited in the wrong places and cause harm. Copper is
notorious in this respect, especially if the liver is compromised. Manganese can
also accumulate in the liver and brain. Calcium can build up in the arteries -
this can be removed by deferoxamine and EDTA. Many women with breast cancer have
calcium deposits in their breasts and only chelation can remove it (Anticancer
Research, 1994). Copper tends to antagonize other minerals like zinc, manganese,
vitamin B6 and molybdenum.

COPPER OVERLOAD The late psychiatrist, Dr. Carl Pfeiffer of Princeton
University, reported in the Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine in 1987 that 64%
of his female patients and 37% of males had elevated copper. Women tend to have
higher copper levels than men because of their higher estrogen levels. Dr.
Pfeiffer correlated high copper levels with high blood pressure, hair loss, PMS,
insomnia, tinnitis, depression, schizophrenia, learning disability, autism and
hyperactivity.

RISK FACTORS FOR COPPER OVERLOAD Excess copper could be in your drinking
water or it could be caused by your plumbing. Well water often has high copper
levels. Back in May 1997, hydro admitted that they dumped about 20 tons of
copper into Lake Ontario; They started doing it in the 70's and continued well
into the 80's. Chocolate, peanuts, shellfish, mushrooms, wheatgerm, liver,
citrus fruits and dairy are all sources of copper. Smoking, clothing dyes
(especially dark ones), copper pots, the new high copper amalgam fillings, and
herbicides and pesticides can increase your copper. Animal feed contains copper
because animals grow faster and gain weight when they are fed copper. This
suggests elevated copper may be a factor in weight gain.


TREATMENTS FOR REMOVING HEAVY METALS:
With the correct treatment, the prognosis may be good even in advanced
cases.

PHLEBOTOMY is the mainstream treatment. It is like giving a blood donation
and is the orthodox method of reducing iron. The phlebotomy will cause you to
become mildly anemic, and the body will draw upon the iron overloaded organ to
replenish what has been lost. This will remove the iron but not the other
metals. Phlebotomy does not remove metals from the brain.
[this last sentence may be inaccurate based on anecdotal information.]

DEFEROXAMINE Deferoxamine is an intravenous chelating agent approved in
Canada only to treat severe iron poisoning, and certain medical conditions which
require multiple blood transfusions such as thalassemia. Deferoxamine isn't
really a drug; it is just a culture of bacteria which ingests and removes the
iron and aluminum and some of the copper and mercury. It can remove
intracellular iron, and can also cross the blood-brain barrier and remove toxic
metals from the brain. It may be used for arthritis, diabetes, atherosclerosis,
cancer and mental illness. It has to be taken intravenously or intramuscularly.
In the hands of a trained clinician, deferoxamine is a very safe and effective
treatment. Deferoxamine and phlebotomy can be combined.

D-PENICILLAMINE D-penicillamine is an oral prescription formula which
removes mainly copper and a little of the iron and some lead and mercury.
D-penicillamine is a substitute chelator, but it has more side effects than
deferoxamine. Research has demonstrated that D-penicillamine can cause damage to
certain organs. Deferoxamine is much safer.

EDTA EDTA is an intravenous chelator which removes mainly copper, lead and
cadmium, but only some of the iron. EDTA is not suitable for people with liver
problems.

ORAL CHELATION FORMULAS Oral chelation sold over the counter is a
misnomer. It will delay the symptoms of iron overload because it contains
anti-oxidants which delay the symptoms, but it doesn't chelate the iron or
remove the metals. Unfortunately some of these formulas have iron and copper in
them which will neutralize the benefits of the antioxidants which generally work
better when the levels of toxic metals are low. Real oral chelation formulas
like D-penicillamine and DMPS are available only by prescription.

ANTIOXIDANTS Antioxidants such as vitamin E and beta carotene will help to
neutralize the free radicals generated by excess iron, and sometimes they can
delay the symptoms for a very long time but they don't chelate the iron or other
metals.

HIGH FIBER DIETS help to decrease iron absorption. Also iron is better
absorbed from animal sources, so it is no coincidence that people with cancer
and other diseases get better when they eat a vegetarian or macrobiotic diet.


DISEASES RELATED TO HIGH IRON AND COPPER LEVELS:
Excessive levels of iron and copper promote production of free radicals in
your body and may cause heart disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, depression,
memory loss and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Iron will accumulate in your most
vulnerable and weakest organs. To some extent this is hereditary: in identical
twins, the target organs are generally the same.

HEART DISEASE In the early 1980's, Dr. Jerome Sullivan established a
correlation between heart disease and iron levels (Lancet, 1981). He found that
after menopause, heart attacks in women rise and approach those of men. Women on
oral contraceptives also have an increased risk of heart disease because they
bleed less, and iron can build up over time. Patients with high blood pressure
may also benefit from phlebotomy to lower iron levels.

CANCER Iron can reactivate a latent infection or tumour. In one experiment
they put rats on severely restricted low calorie diets and these starved animals
lived a lot longer than those on normal diets. The iron content of the food was
subsequently identified as the major life-shortening factor rather than
calories. In a study in Carcinogenesis, 1991, three groups of rats were given
iron deficient, regular or excess iron diets, then injected with a carcinogen.
The rats on the low iron diet developed a lower rate of cancer, and the rats on
the elevated iron diet had higher rates of cancer. When the iron in their diet
was removed, their cancer rate decreased. Iron feeds cancer cells and causes
them to metastasize. Many studies have shown that up to 88% of metastasized
breast cancer patients have elevated serum ferritin. Cancerous breasts have
three times as much iron as normal breasts.

Excessive copper is often involved in cancer and may be a risk factor in
estrogen-dependent cancers. Research has shown that there is a 72% increase in
the copper content of malignant tumours of the ovary, uterus and cervix (Cancer,
Sep 1983). Other studies have shown similar high copper contents in breast
cancers. Estrogen increases copper absorption, causing your copper levels to
rise. This may occur when you take birth control pills or hormone replacement
therapy (Journal of Fertility and Sterility, Nov 1979).

INFECTIONS Dr. Randal Lauffer of Harvard University and other experts
believe that mild iron deficiency may be beneficial in some disease states.
People who are malnourished may be more resistant to infectious diseases than
well-nourished people. It has been noted in times of famine that infectious
illnesses such as tuberculosis and malaria are suppressed during starvation and
reactivated when refeeding programs are instituted. They began testing iron
levels and found that when iron levels rose, infections increased. This was
reported in the Journal of Perspectives in Biology and Medicine (Summer, 1977).

MENTAL PROBLEMS AND HEAVY METALS Iron and copper can interfere with brain
chemicals, the neurotransmitters, which can result in depression, anxiety,
aggressive behaviour and memory loss. Research shows that learning disabled,
hyperactive, retarded and autistic children almost all have elevated copper, and
the ones who don't have elevated lead levels (Psychopharmacology Bulletin,
1978). Violent children tend to have high levels of copper compared with those
who are not violent (Medical Post, Feb 1995). Dr. Yiu at the University of
Western Ontario found that patients who suffered from depression and mental
illness had high iron and copper levels. Dr. Cutler did pioneering work in the
treatment of psychiatric illness using deferoxamine which can cross the
blood-brain barrier and remove these metals (Canadian Journal of Psychiatry,
1994).

LIVER DISEASE Many people with excess iron develop liver dysfunction which
can develop into an enlarged liver, jaundice, and lead to cirrhosis and liver
cancer. Note that liver dysfunction often causes high ammonia in the bloodstream
which can produce symptoms that mimic mental illness.

THYROID DISEASE Copper may be either too high or too low, and iron may be
too high.

RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS There is almost always excess iron and high copper. A
small segment of patients have low copper and these people will benefit from
wearing copper bracelets.

OSTEOPOROSIS Excess iron may lead to osteoporosis because it antagonizes
calcium, manganese and other minerals. Also, if copper levels are either too
high or too low, it may cause osteoporosis. Unfortunately, some formulas for
osteoporosis contain high levels of copper and this can cause problems if your
copper levels are too high.

CANDIDA There will often be high iron and excess copper.

FIBROMYALGIA There will be high iron, and sometimes high copper, lead,
cadmium and mercury. The immune system is suppressed by all these metals.

ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE Research shows that when excess iron enters the brain
and damages it, it opens up the pathway for excess aluminum to enter and cause
even further damage.

PARKINSON'S DISEASE High levels of iron and aluminum are found.

MIGRAINE HEADACHES are a common side effect of birth control pills.
Studies show that high copper foods will trigger migraine headaches.

POST-PARTUM DEPRESSION During pregnancy, copper levels rise. This allows
relaxation of pelvic ligaments and joints to facilitate the birth process. If
the levels do not fall within a few weeks after childbirth, especially if zinc
is low, you may have postpartum depression and possible psychotic states.

INFECTIONS AND CANCERS IN INFANTS Some experts believe pregnant women are
being prescribed too much iron. Blood volume expands during pregnancy and it may
give a false low hemoglobin reading. Some researchers are concerned that excess
iron can cause increases in childhood cancers and may be a contributing factor
in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) because it increases the rate at which
botulism grows. In one study, pregnant women were given iron injections near the
end of term. When the babies were born, they had a lot more severe and frequent
infections than the group who didn't get iron. In a New Zealand study, babies
given iron injections soon after birth developed severe infections. There were
many deaths and they had to discontinue the practice. In a study of children who
were not iron deficient, half of the children were given iron supplements, and
half were given a placebo. After four months, the iron supplemented group showed
retarded growth compared to the placebo group (Lancet, May 1994).

Why are we enriching baby formulas with iron? Not all babies need it.
Breast fed babies are healthier and have fewer infections. Human breast milk
contains a protein called lactoferrin which separates iron from the harmful
microbes. Human breast milk has up to ten times more lactoferrin than cow's
milk. Soya formulas do not contain any.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  Paradox on Sun May 02, 2010 8:21 pm

jdp,

Thanks for that! It's interesting you posted that because I am taking the manganese, zinc, and b6 to treat a condition described by Carl Pfiefer as pyroluria (excess pyrroles in blood which bind to and deplete zinc/b6). I haven't been dx with this yet, but will get the test done after my humifulvate course is over and I can stop all mineral supplements for a while. It is actually not that rare of a disorder but it is not recognized by most MD's, and so difficult to find a physician. There is a high occurrence of it in alcoholics, bipolar, schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorder, etc. If you don't have this condition and you take large amounts of zinc/b6/manganese, you will deplete copper and induce anemia. Most people are probably high in copper and low in zinc, so chances are that I'm fine.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  Paradox on Sun May 02, 2010 8:27 pm

jdp,

BTW, I'd like to find a cheap way to do bloodletting at home. I'm pretty sure I could find some of those vacuum collection vials and needles online. I'm not afraid of needles so that may be the best/easiest way- order from a medical supply store. I think you mentioned leaches, but I'd rather stick myself than deal with those things! Do you have any info on how much blood to 'let' and how often?

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  gonzalito on Sun May 02, 2010 8:52 pm

It would be interesting to stay focused on manganese...

I´ve been reading some reviews of Twinlab´s manganese on iHerb, and there´s a couple of them about hairloss:

From Netherlands
I use this to have the right balance of vitamins. 10 mg a day is a good dosage. I started taking 2 days 20 mg a day. I learned that works to prevent hairloss. You can do that more often iff necessary till hair loss stops...I take it in the morning on an empty stomach

From New Mexico
This seems to be allowing some hair to fill in the 'cowlick' at the crown of my head.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  ubraj on Mon May 03, 2010 2:08 am

Paradox,

When you donate blood it's somewhere around 500 mL if I'm not mistaken. Those who have hemochromatosis they usually remove about 200 - 250 to limit any possibility of passing out, blood sugar problems, etc..

Hemochromatosis is where you absorb more iron from your food than others. I believe it's said it's the most common genetic mutation in the US. The Irish descent are most at risk followed by those of European descent then followed by those with African decent. On that Parksinsons forum some believe while they don't have the full blown gene that collects more iron, it's more of a subtle iron accumulation that starts to become a problem not when they are young but when they are older ... iron and manganese is shown high in those with Parkinsons. Some tested positive for the gene though.

If I'm not mistaken on average 30 mg of iron is accumulated each month. However, women donate 30 mg of iron each month so they have an advantage until menopause.

I remember calculating that men should donate blood about every 8 months to keep up with women. By that figure, donating blood should remove somewhere around 240 mg of iron per 500 mL or standard blood donation at blood bank. I personally still need to donate blood every 2 months for the next 5 years to come out even to women my age.

Anyway, as far as donating blood at home I have a family member with white coat syndrome who may wish me to do it for her. I looked into it a bit and while I can't find any places online to buy the bag or syringe yet you can find the needles on ebay.

Here's a good site http://www.hemochromatosis.co.uk/tpph.html

If you find the full kit for sale let me know as I may buy one.

There is a third method that other parts of the world do called cupping. Here is a video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCCCq1jJY-w personally, I'd choose the leeches, lol.

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Re: Manganese deficiency and hair loss

Post  ubraj on Mon May 03, 2010 2:13 am

Here's a quote

The Centers for Disease Control now calls hemochromatosis the most common genetic disorder in the United States, one that affects 33.5 million Americans. An estimated 32 million are silent carriers, meaning they exhibit no symptoms, while 1.5 million have a double gene mutation because both parents carried the mutant gene, which puts them at high risk. Yet many doctors still believe what they were taught in medical school — that hemochromatosis is a rare disorder

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