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Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

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Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  CausticSymmetry on Sun Oct 17, 2010 10:05 pm

J Dermatol Sci. 2010 Sep 29. [Epub ahead of print]
Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.
Ito T.

Department of Dermatology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1 Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-1192, Japan.

Interest in the hair follicle (HF) has recently increased, yet the detailed mechanisms of HF function and immune privilege (IP) have not yet been elucidated. This review discusses the critical points of immunobiology and hormonal aspects of HFs. The HF is a unique mini-organ because it has its own immune system and hormonal milieu. In addition, the HF immune and hormonal systems may greatly affect skin immunobiology. Therefore, knowledge of HF immunobiology and hormonal aspects will lead to a better understanding of skin biology. The HF has a unique hair cycle (anagen, catagen and telogen) and contains stem cells in the bulge area. The HF is closely related to sebaceous glands and the nervous system. This article reviews the interaction between the endocrine/immune system and HFs, including the pathogenesis of alopecia areata associated with stress.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  LittleFighter on Mon Oct 18, 2010 3:35 am

Good stuff. Something related...

Autoimmune Diseases, Bacteria and GALT (Gut Associated Immune System)

Celiac, Oxidative Stress, Peroxiredoxin, Alopecia

Grain/gluten intolerance, celiac is an immunological attack on the small intestines with increased risk for numerous autoimmune diseases. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is a common sequela of celiac and the two diseases share the same autoantigen, tissue transglutaminase (tTG). Thus, the development of celiac and the production of antibodies to the tTG produced in the intestines, results in a subsequent immunological attack on other tissues that produce lots of tTG, e.g. the thyroid. Gluten intolerance, because of its attack on the intestines and the proximity of a major part of the immune system (GALT), may play a major role as the foundation for autoimmune diseases.

Gluten Intolerance First Step in Autoimmune Diseases

Celiac may also lead to herpatic lesions of the skin, dermatitis herpetiformis and loss of hair, alopecia. In these cases, the autoantigen is peroxiredoxin, an enzyme that eliminates hydrogen peroxide produced as a result of accumulation of reactive oxygen species, e.g. superoxide, associated with inflammation. Peroxiredoxin is also implicated as an autoantigen in periodontal disease, suggesting that celiac may also contribute to dental gum inflammation.

Peroxiredoxin 5 Gene Associated with Alopecia Risk

A recent study (see ref. below) of genes associated with alopecia identified genes involved in Treg and Th-17 development, as well as peroxiredoxin 5 as contributors. As expected, several genes involved in antigen presentation (HLA-DRA, HLA-DQA) were also identified. Th-17 lymphocytes are involved in immune attacks on self tissue, i.e. autoimmune diseases, such as alopecia, in which hair follicles are attacked by the immune system. Tregs control immune attacks on self tissues. Peroxiredoxin is an autoantigen and is produced in elevated amounts around hair follicles attacked in alopecia.

Basic Amino Acids of Peroxiredoxin as Expected for Autoantigen

I checked the amino acid sequence of human peroxiredoxin 5 and found an alternative (-nrrlkrfsmv-) to the triplet of basic amino acids that I expect for an autoantigen. In this case there are two adjacent pairs of basic amino acids (blue rr and kr) that I think precipitate immunological presentation of peroxiredoxin. Peroxiredoxins are produced in response to oxidative stress at sites of inflammation and the presence of celiac compromises the gut associated immune system (GALT) that provides Tregs to restrict autoimmunity, so celiac sets the stage for peroxiredoxin presentation to the immune system and for subsequent production of anti-peroxiredoxin antibodies, autoimmunity and destruction of hair follicles, alopecia.

Anti-Inflammatory Diet Should Avoid and Treat Autoimmunity

Control of autoimmune diseases mediated by peroxiredoxin should benefit from a reduction in the conditions that spawned the diseases:

* Th-17 elevation -- celiac inflammation stimulated by grain/gluten
* Treg loss -- GALT inactivation due to inflammatory diet and inappropriate gut flora
* Autoantigen (basic amino acid concentration) presentation -- oxidative stress stimulation of peroxiredoxin

Treatment would be supported by dietary changes:

* anti-inflammatory diet to control gut inflammation and minimize celiac symptoms (vitamin D, low carb/high saturated fat, high omega-3 to -6 fatty acid ratio, no grains)
* probiotics and soluble fiber (e.g. pectin, inulin) to re-establish gut flora (cure dysbiotic constipation) and GALT function, and development of Tregs
* supplements to compensate for depletion of vitamin C and glutathione by oxidative stress, e.g. vitamin C and acetylcysteine (NAC)

Th-17 and Tregs in HIV Infections

Th-17 cells are also reduced by HIV infection, producing susceptibility to infection, but this infection should also reduce autoimmune disease. The reduction in Th-17 also may be a consequence of problems in the GALT. Therapy for HIV infection should also include diet considerations to increase Th-17 and also Tregs to reduce autoimmune diseases due to unbalanced Th-17.


ref.
Petukhova L, Duvic M, Hordinsky M, Norris D, Price V, Shimomura Y, Kim H, Singh P, Lee A, Chen WV, Meyer KC, Paus R, Jahoda CA, Amos CI, Gregersen PK, Christiano AM. 2010. Genome-wide association study in alopecia areata implicates both innate and adaptive immunity. Nature. 466(7302):113-7.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  LittleFighter on Mon Oct 18, 2010 3:36 am

More...


Heroic Supplement Regimens May Increase Hair Loss
DateThursday, October 14, 2010 at 12:00PM

Anyone who has read my book (or the FREE quick start guide) knows I am not against supplements in the aid of halting hair loss. What I am against is the idea that one can gain any significant mileage, in hair loss or health, by blindly shot-gunning pills. As we will discuss, subscribing to a heroic supplement regimen may have many unintended consequences that are rarely (if ever) talked about.

I am going to venture into uncharted territory here, so bare with me.

Have you ever heard someone say, " _____ supplement made me shed"? A possible explanation may be the fact that dietary supplements exert titanic-sized shifts in the immune system.

The immune system is broken up into two different subgroups of T helper cells dubbed TH-1 and TH-2. TH-1 is the side that reacts immediately to a foreign invader, whereas TH-2 is the delayed response that produces antibodies. In a healthy person TH-1 and TH-2 are balanced. In those experiencing an autoimmune disease (increased gut permeability, gluten intolerance, 90% of those with hypothyroid, psoriasis, heavy metal toxicity, etc.) one of these sides becomes overly dominant.

The Healthy Skeptic himself, Chris Kesser explains succinctly:

"Because autoimmune disease is not only extremely complex, but also highly individualized. Hashimoto’s in one person is not the same as Hashimoto’s in the next person. In one person, Hashimoto’s could present as a Th1-dominant condition. In another, it may present as Th2 dominant. In still another, both the Th1 and Th2 systems might be overactive, or underactive. And each of these cases requires a different approach."

What does this all have to do with hair loss?

In recent posts (and a video), I have explored the idea that balding men are not the picture of good health. Autoimmune diseases, which a balding man may or may not have, are characterized by an overly dominant side of the immune system that leans towards TH-1 or TH-2.

Individuals gulping down tons of pills in a heroic attempt to stop hair loss may be inadvertently boosting an already dominant side of their immune system. What is the result? An increase in inflammatory cytokines, so in other words, it is like pouring gasoline on a hair loss fire.

Here is a short-list of TH-2 and TH-1 stimulators:

Compounds that stimulate TH-2

* Krill Oil (astaxanthin)
* Turmeric/Curcumin
* Greet Tea Extract
* Resveratrol
* Caffeine
* Pycnogenol

Compounds that stimulate TH-1

* Astragalus
* Beta Glucans
* Echinacea
* Garlic

The following compounds create balance between TH-1 and TH-2:

* Omega-3 Fatty Acids
* Vitamin D3
* Vitamin A

There are even some people who react to both compounds that stimulate TH-1 or TH-2. Dr. Kharazzian explains:

"In the book I explain how a challenge using designated herbal and nutritional compounds can determine a TH-1 or TH-2 dominance. One practitioner emailed with a question about a patient who reacted negatively to both TH-1 and TH-2 compounds. I have seen this before in those whose gut barrier is extremely compromised and who react to many things. In this case the focus would first be to first restore health to the gut and then try the challenge again some time later."

I believe most balding men are in a state of metabolic dysregulation. Even if they do not display any overt signs of being sick/hormonally screwed up, there is always the 20-30% chance that something is going on with their liver.

Overcoming hair loss does not have to be so difficult, cryptic and expensive. Focusing on removing autoimmune triggers (omega-6, gluten, dairy, etc.) and choosing smart supplements, like those listed under the third category, should have legs when treating hair loss.


http://www.carnivorehealth.com/main/2010/10/14/heroic-supplement-regimens-may-increase-hair-loss.html

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  Amaranthaceae on Mon Oct 18, 2010 10:55 am



Could it be so that the HF uses stem cells to keep growing new hairs .. and eventually, the stem cells are used up .. the result is HF apoptosis.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  phoenix21 on Mon Oct 18, 2010 4:13 pm

interesting article Littlefighter!

Curious to see what CS has to say about it. I also think it's interesting that the article mentions psoriasis, as Im starting to see some parallels between it and alopecia.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  LittleFighter on Mon Oct 18, 2010 4:46 pm

I totally support the use of supplements in general, unlike the author of that post. There are various important reasons for using them.

What I don't believe is that it's possible is to compensate for a bad, less that ideal diet (specially in certain problems like gut dysbiosis). I have experienced this myself for years, your regimen won't just work, you won't achieve your goals.

I'm pretty sure people like JDP and others are convinced of the crucial aspect of diet in MPB and many many other diseases.

I can't be strict 100% of the time, let's say I'm willing to "have my cake and eat it too" in very specific cases, and compensate with supplements.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  LittleFighter on Mon Oct 18, 2010 4:55 pm

Very interesting stuff that just came in...

Use of probiotics, Vitamin A and D in treating allergy, inflammation, leaky gut, etc.

http://www.nleducation.co.uk/resources/reviews/a-case-history-of-allergy-prevention-and-gastric-health/

A Case History of Allergy Prevention and Gastric Health.
Posted on October 18, 2010 by Michael Ash in Reviews
Case Study


Mrs J is a 31-year-old mother of 3-year-old T who has suffered moderate to severe atopic dermatitis since his early years. His skin has been mostly affected in his inner elbow, behind his knees and occasionally the crease between the abdomen and hip, neck, ears. Treatments to time of their first appointment had consisted of:

* Low-potency topical corticosteroids;
* Avoidance of irritants and triggers; and
* Emollients and bath products that his mother uses consistently.

T is also allergic to cow’s milk and when consumed he will develop a skin rash or increased aggravation of his dermatitis. As I have noticed with many of these patients, he does not react to yogurt and goat cheese. His mum keeps him away from dairy and used soya as a primary substitute.

His medical history does not include asthma or any other respiratory problems other than the occasional URTI’s. His parents work full time so he is managed in a day care facility. He suffers with frequent bouts of gastritis, suggested to be of viral origination collected from his playgroup peers. In his family he has a dad with eczema; his dad’s father and his mother’s sister are also eczematic.

Mrs J is now pregnant in the 4th month (2nd trimester) and wants to do something to reduce the risk of her next child developing atopy and would like to discuss probiotics and prebiotics and whether they may have an impact in utero. On the same subject she wants to know if they may help T’s skin now.
Some Explanations
What Are Probiotics?

Probiotics are defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as “live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host.”[1]These organisms are found in the gastrointestinal tract or as components of foods and beverages. They differ from pre-biotics, which are complex carbohydrates (non digestible, fermentable polysaccharides) that can stimulate the growth and/or activity of beneficial bacteria already in the colon. Whilst they are an interesting area and certainly make for a useful clinical addition, less is known about their effects than probiotics.[2] One of particular interest is found in the product Securil and is called – Propionibacterium freudenreichii, which produce propionic acid, a natural biological acid that benefits the bifidus flora.[3]

Most probiotics are either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium and their various species and strains (for example, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidus). Other common probiotics are yeasts; the most documented form of yeast used in human gastrointestinal function is Saccharomyces boulardii. They may also be combined in some products and whilst there is a paucity of data on this – there are indications that a selection of bacteria in which they confer similar effects may be better than a single strain.

Probiotics appear able to reinforce the integrity of the intestinal lining as a protective barrier to prevent invasion by pathogenic organisms or over stimulation from food antigens, and they are purported to prevent harmful bacteria or yeast from breaching the gastrointestinal mucosa.[4] They have an effect on both setting up and maintaining regulation in the intestinal mucosal barrier (assisting with tolerance) and may exert clinical effects beyond the nutritional value of food.[5] This effect is the primary rationale for their efficacy in preventing infectious or other forms of diarrhoea and for the treatment of allergic conditions.[6]
How are probiotics delivered?

Mostly they are provided as tablets, powder, capsules and can also be mixed into beverages such as yogurt, milk, or juice. Bifidobacteria have a good level of safety when used orally, including in those under 2 years and ill neonates.[7] For preventing diarrhoea in children, 5-10 billion live Lactobacillus GG have been used twice daily as tablets. Doses of 10-100 billion live organisms are available in tablet form, and capsules of 30 billion CFU are also available.
Clinical Evidence

The greatest number of studies supporting the benefits of probiotics is in the management of diarrhoea-associated diseases. Several probiotics (Saccharomyces boulardii and a mixture of L acidophilus and B bifidum) have shown efficacy for preventing traveller’s diarrhoea with a relative risk (RR) reduction of 15% (RR=0.85, P < .001).[8]

Their success in controlling gastric distress after antibiotics and rotavirus infection related diarrhoea are also well supported. Probiotics have also been shown to benefit antibiotic-associated [9] and paediatric infectious diarrhoea, especially rotavirus-related diarrhoea.[10] Probiotics have been used for a variety of gastrointestinal disorders as well, including these clinically successful applications for conditions related to inflammatory bowel disease:

* Lactobacillus GG to maintain remission in those with ulcerative colitis;[11]
* S boulardii in combination with mesalamine to prevent clinical relapse of Crohn’s disease.[12]

Probiotics have also been found to be helpful in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.[13] In a recent meta-analysis, the odds ratio (OR) in favour of active probiotic treatment over placebo in children for diarrhoea was 0.39 (P < .001) for yeast and 0.34 (P < .01) for Lactobacilli.[14] That is to say that for those children taking the probiotic there was about two fifths to one third of the incidence of diarrhoea.

Allergic diseases. Two Cochrane reviews looking at the prevention of allergic disease and food hypersensitivity in infants found positive evidence from studies using LGG: Lactobacillus rhamnosus in favour of eczema prevention but not treatment. [15],[16]

Atopic Dermatitis

There are a number of moderately supportive reviews for the use of several species of Lactobacilli for atopic dermatitis;[17],[18] these reports were based on placebo-controlled, randomised studies, using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index for assessment, and tended to demonstrate better outcomes for those children with a dairy/cow’s milk allergy.[19]

Of relevance for Mrs. J’s case, when mothers consumed probiotics during pregnancy (starting 2 to 4 weeks before delivery), the likelihood of atopic dermatitis in the child was reduced at 2 years by about 50% in one study,[20] and the cumulative effect on prevention was still evident at 4 years.[21] A more recent study out of the Netherlands showed that supplementation of a mixed strain of probiotics had a significant reduction on atopy when taken during pregnancy that lasted for the first 2 years.[22]

But other trials using different bacteria have been unsuccessful demonstrating effects in the management or prevention of atopy.

What can be said is that overall, while there is a sound theoretical basis for a benefit of using probiotics for allergic disease, there is currently insufficient data to recommend it for all allergic conditions. With that said, there is more evidence supporting its use in preventing atopic dermatitis in children than for other allergic or immune conditions.
How did the patient respond?

Mrs J had wanted the answers to 2 questions.

1. Would taking probiotics during her pregnancy reduce the risk of atopic dermatitis for her unborn child?
2. Would probiotics Help reduce her son T’s severity of his atopic dermatitis?

Treatment:

Because of T’s cow’s milk allergy, probiotic capsules & powder were recommended rather than milk products, plus it is not clinically possible to deliver adequate quantities of a probiotic via yogurt or milk products.
For T I recommended:

* 1 x S. Boulardii daily
* ½ teaspoon of Bifido Bifidus
* 1 capsule of LGG
* ½ teaspoon of 4:1 oil containing omega 6 and 3 from organic cold pressed seeds.

For Mrs J I recommended

* 1x S Boulardii
* 1 tspn of Bifido Bifidus
* 1 capsule of LGG
* 12,500iu of vitamin A every other day – her diet was low in carotenoids and Vitamin A is essential for Treg cell development.[23]
* 5,000iu Vitamin D for immune regulation.[24]

The recommendation until recently was that mothers should avoid allergenic foods such as peanuts. However, there has been a change of direction based on recent papers from the LEAP project[25] to suggest that maternal exposure to small amounts may confer tolerance in utero and in early development. I suggested that she consume small amounts of milk with her probiotics every few days to see if it might transfer some immunity/tolerance via the dendritic cells being reprogrammed with the probiotics, thereby delivering a combined message of milk proteins and induction of IL-10 and TGFβ.
The outcomes:

T had a significant improvement in his skin and over 12 months of treatment had a significant increase in tolerance to dairy products. Mrs J delivered a healthy son, who had no atopy in the first 12 months whilst I was tracking the case.

On a follow up 2 years later the supplementation programme for Mrs T had been continued until weaning and then discontinued. T had continued on a daily programme for 18 months and had then stopped and had no re-occurrence of eczema except if eating enough dairy to trigger a response – this would vary but would roughly equate to 1 pint of milk.

The new brother M had been free of all atopy up to the point of follow up and was a healthy young boy.

When benefits occur, it is completely safe and sensible to continue to take probiotics at these doses for a number of years. Monitoring of the patient every few months, at the least, is recommended.

This approach is also applicable to any individual with atopy, not just babies and young children.

Not all patients respond so well as this family and they may need further exploration, including a very careful elimination of food triggers including the use of relevant food allergy and intolerance tests. It is also important to consider that poor digestion in the stomach may be adding to the antigenic load and digestive enzymes may also be a factor. The use of agents containing glutamine and epithelial growth factor for the restoration of gut lining integrity may also be considered in these more stubborn cases.
References
[1] FAO/WHO. Guidelines for the evaluation of probiotics in food. Food and Health Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization. Working Group Report 2002. Available at ftp://ftp.fao.org/es/esn/food/wgreport2.pdf. Accessed August 11, 2010.

[2] Collins MD, Gibson GR. “Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics: approaches for modulating the microbial ecology of the gut.” Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 May;69(5):1052S-1057S. View Abstract

[3] Hatakka K, Holma R, El-Nezami H, Suomalainen T, Kuisma M, Saxelin M, Poussa T, Mykkänen H, Korpela R. The influence of Lactobacillus rhamnosus LC705 together with Propionibacterium freudenreichii ssp. shermanii JS on potentially carcinogenic bacterial activity in human colon. Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Dec 10;128(2):406-10. Epub 2008 Sep 27. View Abstract

[4] Chiang BL, Sheih YH, Wang LH, et al. Enhancing immunity by dietary consumption of a probiotic lactic acid bacterium (Bifidobacterium lactis HN019): optimization and definition of cellular immune responses. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000; 54:849-855. View Abstract

[5] Rautava S, Kalliomaki M, Isolauri E. New therapeutic strategy for combating and increasing burden on allergic disease: Probiotics, A nutrition, allergy, mucosal immunology and intestinal microbiota (MANI) research group report. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005;116:31-37. View Abstract

[6] Prescott SL, Bjorksten B. Probiotics for the prevention or treatment of allergic diseases. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007;120: 255-262. Epub 2007 Jun 4. View Abstract

[7] Cabana MD, Shane AL, Chao C, Oliva-Hemker M. Probiotics in primary care pediatrics. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2006 Jun;45(5):405-10. Review. View Abstract

[8] Johnston BC, Supina AL, Vohra S. Probiotics for pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea: a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials. CMAJ. 2006;175:377-383 View Abstract

[9] McFarland L. Meta-analysis of probiotics for the prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhea and the treatment of Clostridium difficile disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 2006;101:812-822. View Abstract

[10] Sazawal S, Hiremath G, Dhingra U, et al. Efficacy of probiotics in prevention of acute diarrhoea: a meta-analysis of masked, randomised, placebo-controlled trials. Lancet Infect Dis. 2006;6:374-382. View Abstract

[11] Zocco MA dVL, Cermonini F, Piscaglia AC, et al. Efficacy of Lactobacillus GG in maintaining remission of ulcerative colitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006;23:1567-1574. View Abstract

[12] Guslandi M, Mezzi G, Sorghi M, Testoni PA. Saccharomyces boulardii in maintenance treatment of Crohn’s disease. Dig Dis Sci. 2000;45:1462-1464. View Abstract

[13] Kajander K, Myllyluoma E, Rajili-StojanoviæM, et al. Clinical trial: multispecies probiotic supplementation alleviates the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome and stabilizes intestinal microbiota. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2008;27:48-57. Epub 2007 Oct 5. View Abstract

[14] D’Souza AL, Rajikumar C, Cooke J, Bulpitt CJ. Probiotics in prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhoea: meta-analysis. BMJ. 2002;324:1361. View Abstract

[15] Osborn DA, Sinn JK. Probiotics in infants for prevention of allergic disease and food hypersensitivity. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007:CD006475. View Abstract

[16] Osborn DA, Sinn JK. Prebiotics in infants for prevention of allergic disease and food hypersensitivity. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007:CD006474. View Abstract

[17] Lee J, Seto D, Bielory L. Meta-analysis of clinical trials of probiotics for prevention and treatment of pediatric atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008;121:116-121 View Abstract

[18] Ogden NS, Bielory L. Probiotics: a complementary approach in the treatment and prevention of pediatric atopic disease. Curr Opin Allergy Clin Immunol. 2005;5:179-184. View Abstract

[19] Rosenfeldt V, Benfeldt E, Nielsen SD, et al. Effect of probiotic Lactobacillus strains in children with atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003;111389-111395. View Abstract

[20] Kalliomäki, M, Salminen S, Arvilommi H, Kero P, Koskinen P, Isolauri E. Probiotics in primary prevention of atopic disease: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet. 2001;357:1076-1079 View Abstract

[21] Kalliomäki M, Salminen S, Poussa T, Arvilommi H, Isolauri E. Probiotics and prevention of atopic disease: 4-year follow-up of a randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet. 2003;361:1869-1871. View Abstract

[22] L.E. Niers, et al., “The Effects of Selected Probiotic Strains on the Development of Eczema (The PANDA study),” Allergy (9 April 2009) View Abstract

[23] Zhou X, Kong N, Wang J, Fan H, Zou H, Horwitz D, Brand D, Liu Z, Zheng SG.

Cutting edge: all-trans retinoic acid sustains the stability and function of natural regulatory T cells in an inflammatory milieu. J Immunol. 2010 Sep 1;185(5):2675-9. Epub 2010 Aug 2. View Abstract

[24] Halken S. Prevention of allergic disease in childhood: clinical and epidemiological aspects of primary and secondary allergy prevention. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2004 Jun;15 Suppl 16:4-5, 9-32. Review. View Abstract

[25] Du Toit G, Katz Y, Sasieni P, Mesher D, Maleki SJ, Fisher HR, Fox AT, Turcanu V, Amir T, Zadik-Mnuhin G, Cohen A, Livne I, Lack G. Early consumption of peanuts in infancy is associated with a low prevalence of peanut allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2008 Nov;122(5):984-91. View Abstract

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  action<reaction on Mon Oct 18, 2010 4:59 pm

LittleFighter - Fantastic info, I was thinking similar when I first read CS's post here.
The gut is the place to start when it comes to curing anything IMO.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  ubraj on Mon Oct 18, 2010 7:29 pm

LittleFighter wrote:
I'm pretty sure people like JDP and others are convinced of the crucial aspect of diet in MPB and many many other diseases.

Definitely. It can get very complicated but yes, every hair loss sufferer needs to experiment with diet to see how it effects them.

The good news is that about 6 - 12 months on a strict diet, enough healing has taken place that in a lot of cases can go back to consuming small amounts of the food that use to give a reaction.

In short, most autoimmune diseases are either caused by or exaccerbated by diet. Also, many ailments should be reclassified as an autoimmune or autoimmunish type of condition based on this information... including androgenic alopecia/MPB.

Interestingly, it's really pathogens that are causing the issue with diet and their heavy metals and toxins that they accumulate. Mercury is a good one. http://www.curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1476858#i Goes beyond mercury of course but a good way to get my point across.

hope this helps someone.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  CausticSymmetry on Mon Oct 18, 2010 11:16 pm

Some really great posts on this thread!

Hair loss in most cases is autoimmune just like when patient get arthritis. Arthritis is not an incurable condition like conventional medicine teaches, but a condition has is precipitated by an infection. Infections are worsened by a poor diet.

It's probably safe to say that much of our food and environment has changed so much that auto immune activity hard to avoid.

I've heard of cases just with gluten sensitivity that a 99% avoidance isn't enough to prevent hair loss in very sensitive individuals, but a 100% avoidance does.

It would be an interesting test to see if gluten enzymes are enough for some cases.

Then there is genetically modified grains, some are allergic to.

Eczema and Psoriasis are highly sensitive to food allergy.

Immune reactivity to IgE following ingestion of questionable foods can maybe help narrow down the diet culprits.

The following product (Phytocort) helps balance TH1 and TH2 cytokine levels. It is quite successful in asthma treatment. Its primary ingredient, Sophora does have merit in hair loss treatment.

http://www.iherb.com/Allergy-Research-Group-Nutricology-PhytoCort-120-Veggie-Caps/7783?at=0



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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  Decro435 on Tue Oct 19, 2010 12:13 am

I used to randomly get eczema like eruptions around where my intestines are and around the side of my hip. I also got it under the crease of my ear. They where circular dry patches which were sometimes itchy. I got them maybe twice a year. Coal Tar baths and a topical steroid used to clear it within a day. It doesn't happen that often now but still happens.

Is this indicative of an Allergy?. I haven't seen it in a while, why would it just go away and if it had anything to do with my hair loss then why has that got worse while it has got better?.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  Fibonacci on Tue Oct 19, 2010 12:43 am

CS, whats your response to the comment below, taken from the Healthy Hair Diet web site, which denigrates the supplement approach you advocate( yet still advertises itself on here- ironically)? Fib

Individuals gulping down tons of pills in a heroic attempt to stop hair loss may be inadvertently boosting an already dominant side of their immune system. What is the result? An increase in inflammatory cytokines, so in other words, it is like pouring gasoline on a hair loss fire.

Here is a short-list of TH-2 and TH-1 stimulators:

Compounds that stimulate TH-2

* Krill Oil (astaxanthin)
* Turmeric/Curcumin
* Greet Tea Extract
* Resveratrol
* Caffeine
* Pycnogenol

Compounds that stimulate TH-1

* Astragalus
* Beta Glucans
* Echinacea
* Garlic

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  CausticSymmetry on Tue Oct 19, 2010 1:35 am

Fibonacci - I believe in testing for immune reactivity to allergenic foods. However, I do not believe that the list provided will 'stimulate' an imbalance of Th-1/Th-2 with supplements. I believe the opposite will occur with supplements in that it will promote homeostasis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1809642/?tool=pubmed

Simply stated, avoid problem foods if indicated. And of course, in my opinion supplements are essential in most cases.
I wouldn't dream of eating perfect always.



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http://www.immortalhair.org/hairconsultation.htm

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  Whip on Tue Oct 19, 2010 1:37 am

CausticSymmetry wrote:
Hair loss in most cases is autoimmune just like when patient get arthritis. Arthritis is not an incurable condition like conventional medicine teaches, but a condition has is precipitated by an infection. Infections are worsened by a poor diet.

CS, what would you recommend for offing the arthritis bug? Do you know what infection causes it or additional steps specifically for that? I'm on the regimens on here for both hair and for health.

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Re: Hair follicle is a target of stress hormone and autoimmune reactions.

Post  tonyj on Tue Oct 19, 2010 1:43 am

This study suggest that bacteria may play a more significant role in hair loss.

Is there a ‘gut–brain–skin axis’?
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-0625.2009.01060.x/pdf

Abstract: Emerging evidence arising from interdisciplinary
research supports the occurrence of communication axes between
organs, such as the brain–gut or brain–skin axis. The latter is
employed in response to stress challenge, along which neurogenic
skin inflammation and hair growth inhibition is mediated. We
now show that ingestion of a Lactobacillus strain in mice
dampens stress-induced neurogenic skin inflammation and the
hair growth inhibition. In conclusion, we are introducing a
hypothesis, encouraged by our pilot observations and resting
upon published prior evidence from the literature, which
amalgamates previously proposed partial concepts into a new,
unifying model, i.e. the gut–brain–skin axis. This concept suggests
that modulation of the microbiome by deployment of probiotics
can not only greatly reduce stress-induced neurogenic skin
inflammation but even affect a very complex cutaneous
phenomenon of (mini-) organ transformation, i.e. hair follicle
cycling. These observations raise the intriguing prospect that
feeding of just the right kind of bacteria can exert profound
beneficial effects on skin homoeostasis, skin inflammation, hair
growth and peripheral tissue responses to perceived stress.

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