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Cooking vs. lacto fermenting Cruciferous veggies

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Cooking vs. lacto fermenting Cruciferous veggies

Post  teacup on Thu Jan 20, 2011 5:07 pm

Quote:
Cruciferous vegetables can potentially be goitrogenic (inducing goiter formation). They contain enzymes that interfere with the formation of thyroid hormone.[2][3] Cooking for 30 minutes significantly reduces the amount of goitrogens and nitriles. At high intake of crucifers, the goitrogens inhibit the incorporation of iodine into thyroid hormone and also the transfer of iodine into milk by the mammary gland.[4]
<-- wikipedia

But, we all know the brocolli, cauliflower and others contain beneficial nutrients

Quote:
they are high in vitamin C and soluble fibre and contain multiple nutrients and phytochemicals with potential anti-cancer properties: diindolylmethane, sulforaphane and selenium. Both diindolylmethane, sulforaphane, and many other sharp-tasting substances in these vegetables are produced from substances called glucosinolates.
<-wikipedia


What's the better way to "prepare" cruciferous vegetables for human consumption to destroy chemicals that cause thyroid issues (cooking or fermenting)?


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Re: Cooking vs. lacto fermenting Cruciferous veggies

Post  mphatesmpb on Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:13 pm

This is from the Linus Pauling article on cruciferous vegetables:


Very high intakes of cruciferous vegetables, such as cabbage and turnips, have been found to cause hypothyroidism (insufficient thyroid hormone) in animals (68). There has been one case report of an 88-year-old woman developing severe hypothyroidism and coma following consumption of an estimated 1.0 to 1.5 kg/day of raw bok choy for several months (69). Two mechanisms have been identified to explain this effect. The hydrolysis of some glucosinolates found in cruciferous vegetables (e.g., progoitrin) may yield a compound known as goitrin, which has been found to interfere with thyroid hormone synthesis. The hydrolysis of another class of glucosinolates, known as indole glucosinolates, results in the release of thiocyanate ions, which can compete with iodine for uptake by the thyroid gland. Increased exposure to thiocyanate ions from cruciferous vegetable consumption or, more commonly, from cigarette smoking, does not appear to increase the risk of hypothyroidism unless accompanied by iodine deficiency. One study in humans found that the consumption of 150 g/day (5 oz/day) of cooked Brussels sprouts for four weeks had no adverse effects on thyroid function (70).

Until reading your post I believed that the only mechanism by which cruciferous vegetables promote hypothyroidism is interfering with the uptake of iodine, but it seems that they also interfere with the synthesis of thyroid hormones. I guess I'll have to reconsider my habit of eating tons of raw broccoli.

CS has mentioned on another thread that thyroid-suppressive effects described in the animal study only occurred in animals that were already deficient in iodine. And the 88-yr old woman was eating 1-1.5 kg of cruciferous vegetables, which is probably way more than a reasonable amount.

I know that boiling and even steaming significantly reduces the glucosinolate content of cruciferous vegetables, and the various derivatives of these glucosinolates are the basis of the health benefits conferred by the vegetables.

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Re: Cooking vs. lacto fermenting Cruciferous veggies

Post  teacup on Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:37 pm

if cooking destroys the nutrients we want to eat maybe fermenting is a better choice for preparing cruciferous veggies. I am just speculating.

I think the chinese never ate bok choy raw they always cooked it.

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Re: Cooking vs. lacto fermenting Cruciferous veggies

Post  Silverlin on Fri Jan 21, 2011 11:58 am

teacup - Awesome idea! Only on a rare occasion do I eat cruciferous vegetables totally raw, I have only steamed them, but fermenting them would add an extra kick!

I can't say whats absolutely better, but I guess a mixture of fermented vegetables with steamed would be the best bet.

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