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Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

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Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  mphatesmpb on Wed Sep 07, 2011 5:42 pm

Been leafing through ncbi and google scholar database...


[Acid oligosaccharides as the active principle of aqueous carrot extracts for prevention and therapy of gastrointestinal infections].
[Article in German]
Kastner U, Glasl S, Follrich B, Guggenbichler JP, Jurenitsch J.
Source
Institut für Pharmakognosie der Universität Wien, Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Wien. kastner@ccri.univie.ac.at
Abstract
Adherence of microorganisms to the intestinal mucosa is an important and initial step in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal infections and mediated by carbohydrate structures on the cell surface. Adherence can be blocked by carbohydrate receptor analogues. Aqueous extracts from carrots (carrot soup) contain acidic oligosaccharides, which are able to block adherence of various enteropathogenic microorganisms to HEp-2 cells and human intestinal mucosa in vitro. Dependent on the grade of polymerisation the most potent blocking ability was seen for trigalacturonic acid. Clinical studies revealed, that aqueous carrot extracts are significantly superior to the basic glucose-electrolyt-solution for oral rehydration in acute gastrointestional infections of children.
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  mphatesmpb on Wed Sep 07, 2011 5:47 pm


Fermentation by the human large intestine microbial community in an in vitro semicontinuous culture system.
Miller TL, Wolin MJ.
Abstract
A semicontinuous culture of the microbial community of the human large intestine that was maintained over 81 days is described. The initial inoculum was feces, and about 200 ml of nutrient suspension was fed to 500 ml of fermentor contents once or twice daily. The nutrient suspension contained comminuted fibrous food, sodium deoxycholate, urea, acid-hydrolyzed casein, vitamins, and salts. The fermentation was monitored, and the major products were acetate, propionate, butyrate, methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. The concentration of anaerobic bacteria was 2 X 10(9) per ml of culture contents and was 100 times that of fecal coliforms. When the nutrient suspension contained lettuce, celery, carrots, and unsweetened applesauce, the predominant nonsporeforming anaerobes isolated were Bacteroides species. When carrots and applesauce were omitted, the predominant nonsporeforming isolates were Fusobacterium species. On both diets, clostridia were isolated that resembled Clostridium clostridiiforme. The fermentation and bacteriological analyses indicated that the in vitro ecosystem appears to be a reasonable facsimile of the large intestine ecosystem.
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  droddy on Wed Sep 07, 2011 5:51 pm

mphatesmpb wrote:

Fermentation by the human large intestine microbial community in an in vitro semicontinuous culture system.
Miller TL, Wolin MJ.
Abstract
A semicontinuous culture of the microbial community of the human large intestine that was maintained over 81 days is described. The initial inoculum was feces, and about 200 ml of nutrient suspension was fed to 500 ml of fermentor contents once or twice daily. The nutrient suspension contained comminuted fibrous food, sodium deoxycholate, urea, acid-hydrolyzed casein, vitamins, and salts. The fermentation was monitored, and the major products were acetate, propionate, butyrate, methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. The concentration of anaerobic bacteria was 2 X 10(9) per ml of culture contents and was 100 times that of fecal coliforms. When the nutrient suspension contained lettuce, celery, carrots, and unsweetened applesauce, the predominant nonsporeforming anaerobes isolated were Bacteroides species. When carrots and applesauce were omitted, the predominant nonsporeforming isolates were Fusobacterium species. On both diets, clostridia were isolated that resembled Clostridium clostridiiforme. The fermentation and bacteriological analyses indicated that the in vitro ecosystem appears to be a reasonable facsimile of the large intestine ecosystem.

Woah.... Great job Mph.


Last edited by droddy on Wed Sep 07, 2011 5:52 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : spelling)
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  tom_123 on Sat Jul 14, 2012 11:06 am

Sorry to bring this old thread up. In plain english what does the above mean? Are carrots good or bad?
i have been eating a lot of them lately!

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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  AS54 on Sat Jul 14, 2012 12:44 pm

They're good. Fusobacterium are one of more problematic bacteria of the mouth. But as for clostridium, is this a normal communal species? I know c difficile is, but what about this one? I would love to know if someone has any background on the subject.
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  LittleFighter on Mon Jul 16, 2012 7:41 am

Clostridium can be important, by producing butyric acid as a byproduct and also inhibiting other toxic bacteria. Of course there is pathogenic Clostridium like strains that produce neurotoxins.

There are a few probiotics using Clostridium Butyricum as a probiotic, and it is effective for infections, colitis and other conditions. Used for humans and animals.


http://www.bio-three.com/human.php


http://aorhealth.com/html/products.php?id=230

I remember a paper, relating the mouth as a source of probiotics, including clostridium, and how strerlizing it might not be the best idea. It also related IBS and other problems, indicating how people with gut problems have a tendency to wash more their teeth and go more often to the dentist.

Just don't think this is 100% correct... so wash your teeth with natual stuff... otherwise infections in the mouth are worse.

In the last years we are seeing an increase in probiotic strains isolated from healthy mouths, and a few of them are commercially available.
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  AS54 on Mon Jul 16, 2012 11:58 am

Awesome Littlefighter, thank you. The more I've been reading your posts and others regarding the gut, the more I'm realizing that mine is likely the source of all my problems.
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  LittleFighter on Tue Jul 17, 2012 5:11 pm

Magnificent ....

"The ability of the gut microbiota and oral probiotics to influence systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, glycemic control, tissue lipid content and even mood itself, may have important implications in..."

It's about time to rethink the role of intestinal flora in pretty much... everything.


Acne vulgaris, probiotics and the gut-brain-skin axis - back to the future?

http://www.gutpathogens.com/content/3/1/1/
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  Beebrox on Tue Jul 17, 2012 8:01 pm

The lines of communication, as mediated by gut microbes, may be direct and indirect - ultimately influencing the degree of acne by a systemic effect on inflammation, oxidative stress, glycemic control, tissue lipid levels, pathogenic bacteria, as well as levels of neuropeptides and mood-regulating neurotransmitters.

Nice find.

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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  ubraj on Wed Jul 18, 2012 4:07 am

Clostridium is a nasty one.

Have made a few prior posts on this one and it's relation to ailments. For example, there was a hour long video on autism and probiotics that was posted on this site. In it, it talked about how clostridium was commonly found in those with autism.

Well, clostridium produces a solvent (methanol). This being important as solvents allow retroviruses in the body to take hold... as in autoimmune ailments, cancer, etc.. Not to mention being important as it allows parasites to complete their life cycle rather than requiring other animals and methods to go from an egg to a full grown adult.

Clostridium actually comes from a fluke/parasite. So those with a clostridium problem also need to treat for flukes/parasites.

Anyhow, solvents being found in commercial beauty products but also processed foods as well and partly why there has been talk to avoid commercial beauty products for those with cancer or products such as isopropyl alcohol.


From the Beck papers:
>>>>>>>Dr Phillip B Hylemon of the Medical College of Virginia suspects that more common bacteria, clostridia and eubacteria, may play a similar role in gallstones. He found that gallstone patients have 100 to 1,000 times as many of these bacteria in their intestines as do healthy people<<<<


A quote,

"From the Beck papers:
>>>>>>>Dr Phillip B Hylemon of the Medical College of Virginia suspects that more common bacteria, clostridia and eubacteria, may play a similar role in gallstones. He found that gallstone patients have 100 to 1,000 times as many of these bacteria in their intestines as do healthy people<<<<"

more info - http://www.curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1342125

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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  imprisoned-radical on Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:30 pm

We should create a list of pathogenic intestinal bacteria, and research the best ways to control them.

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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  Yanks on Wed Jul 18, 2012 10:42 pm

^ great idea! and make it a sticky...
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  AS54 on Thu Jul 19, 2012 1:36 am

Love this idea. But I would suspect that a proper biofilm protocol like either of the ones linked to here would probably handle many of them, given they all live in colonies of diverse makeup. Break the defense down and get the antibiotics in there. But in this case, knowing that carrots tend to have natural antibiotic potential is valuable, and I suppose it is possible that each species has a particular susceptibility.

http://www.advancedhealing.com/blog/2009/09/25/dr-ettingers-biofilm-protocol-for-lyme-and-gut-pathogens/

http://agapeautism.com/protocols/75-biofilmsexplained

http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.com/2009/09/cure-for-inflammatory-diseases.html

http://www.herbsforlyme.com/category-s/225.htm

I would be more interested in knowing sure fire ways of eliminating planktonic bacteria like Chlamydia Pneumonia which often get into the joints. How can we deliver these chemicals to these areas of the body effectively?
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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  imprisoned-radical on Mon Dec 12, 2016 4:44 pm

Have been researching this topic again. Posting some studies on this topic in case anyone is interested.


Antimicrobial activity of shredded carrot extracts on food-borne bacteria and yeast.
Babic I1, Nguyen-the C, Amiot MJ, Aubert S.
Author information
Abstract
Purified ethanolic extracts of peeled and shredded carrots showed an antimicrobial effect against a range of food-borne micro-organisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration, expressed as mg ml-1 dried carrot material used for the extraction were: Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 27; Listeria monocytogenes, > 27 < 55; Staphylococcus aureus, > 27 < 55; Pseudomonas fluorescens, > 55 < 110; Candida lambica, > 55 < 110; Escherichia coli, > 110 < 220. The antimicrobial activity was not linked to phenolic compounds but was presumably due to apolar components. Free saturated fatty acid (dodecanoic acid) and methyl esters of saturated fatty acids (of dodecanoic and pentadecanoic acids) were identified in purified active extracts of carrots by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and could be responsible for the antimicrobial activity. This effect did not seem to play a role in the resistance of shredded carrots to microbial spoilage, although the antimicrobial activity was present in fresh carrots at concentrations sufficient to inhibit spoilage bacteria.


Effect of carrot intake on cholesterol metabolism and on antioxidant status in cholesterol-fed rat.
Nicolle C1, Cardinault N, Aprikian O, Busserolles J, Grolier P, Rock E, Demigné C, Mazur A, Scalbert A, Amouroux P, Rémésy C.
Author information
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Vegetables are major dietary sources of fibers and antioxidants such as carotenoids, polyphenols and vitamin C which contribute to explain their protective effects against cardiovascular diseases.
AIM OF THE STUDY:
We investigated in the rat the effects of a 3-week supplementation of the diet with carrot (15% dry matter) on lipid metabolism and antioxidant status.
RESULTS:
A significant decrease of cholesterol level in liver (-44%; P= 0.0007) was observed together with a reduction of the level of liver triglycerides (-40%; P= 0.0005). Fecal total steroids excretion increased by 30% upon feeding the carrot diet as compared to the control. The secretion of bile acids was maintained, whereas the cholesterol apparent absorption was reduced in rats fed carrot diet. Carrot consumption also improved the antioxidant status. It significantly decreased the urinary excretion of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced the TBARS levels in heart, increased the vitamin E plasmatic level and tended to increase the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) as compared to the controls. The carrot diet provided carotenoid antioxidants: 5.1 mg beta-carotene, 1.6 mg alpha-carotene and 0.25mg lutein per 100 g diet. No carotenoids were found in plasma whereas the three carotenoids were detected in the plasma of the rats fed the carrot diet at 125, 41, 43 nmol/L respective concentrations. beta-Carotene was also detected in liver and heart.
CONCLUSION:
Carrot consumption modifies cholesterol absorption and bile acids excretion and increases antioxidant status and these effects could be interesting for cardiovascular protection.

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Re: Carrots and Intestinal Microbiota

Post  johndoe1225 on Mon Dec 12, 2016 5:17 pm

Interesting this thread should be brought back now, after having found an old blender in my house, I am drinking a ton of carrot smoothies, they really taste amazing.  I used to use baby carrots but now use big bags of whole ones. Such a beautiful orange color and taste!

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