Search
 
 

Display results as :
 


Rechercher Advanced Search

Navigation
 Portal
 Index
 Memberlist
 Profile
 FAQ
 Search
Natural Hair Growth Products
Brought to you by
Hair Loss Forum
Navigation
 Portal
 Index
 Memberlist
 Profile
 FAQ
 Search
Natural Hair Growth Products
Brought to you by
Hair Loss Forum

Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 7:21 pm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20620762

and this work is even referenced by Linus Pauling's legacy:
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/skin/EFA/EFAskinref.html

"Healing fats of the skin: the structural and immunologic roles of the omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids.
Linoleic acid (18:2omega6) and alpha-linolenic
acid (18:3omega3) represent the parent fats of the two main classes of polyunsaturated fatty acids: the omega-6 (n-6) and the omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids, respectively. Linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid both give rise to other long-chain fatty acid derivatives, including gamma-linolenic acid and arachidonic acid (omega-6 fatty acids) and docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid (omega-3 fatty acids). These fatty acids are showing promise as safe adjunctive treatments for many skin disorders, including atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne vulgaris, systemic lupus erythematosus, nonmelanoma skin cancer, and melanoma. Their roles are diverse and include maintenance of the stratum corneum permeability barrier, maturation and differentiation of the stratum corneum, formation and secretion of lamellar bodies, inhibition of proinflammatory eicosanoids, elevation of the sunburn threshold, inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines[/b] (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, and interleukin-12), inhibition of lipoxygenase, promotion of wound healing, and promotion of apoptosis in malignant cells, including melanoma. They fulfill these functions independently and through the modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated and Toll-like receptors."

Also posted here - and a very good read:-
http://www.acne.org/messageboard/blog/6821/entry-26278-from-acne-prone-skinsebum-deficient-in-linoleic-acid-possible-topical-solution/

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/314390-acne-prone-skinsebum-deficient-in-linoleic-acid-possible-topical-solution/#entry3234640

Now, Linoleic acid...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linoleic_acid

"Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid that must be consumed for proper health. A diet only deficient in linoleate causes mild skin scaling, hair loss,[6] and poor wound healing in rats"


So what are good topical sources of Linoleic Acid - Grapeseed oil is very good as is sunflower oil, and from an ayurvedic point of view sesame oil is good.

However, Oleic acid has been linked to worsening dermatitis - due to demodex - and yeast in scalp - so of those 3; sunflower oil has a high oleic acid content (20 - 40%), sesame oil is 35 - 50% whereas grapeseed oil is only 15%.

So where can we find the LA and ALA we want with low Oleic acid. My research indicates that Oleic acid is the reason many hair growth specialists - CS, Gaunitz - shy away from topical oils as it tends to promote the demodex etc,. Yet you can read Prague and Duketronix posts that topical oils are absolutely critical for substantial regrowth.

Of note HEMP oil with its 3.8: 1 ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3 - so it appears to have both LA and ALA in the perfect ratio. Here is a great paper on the history of learning the right Omega 6 to Omega 3 ratios:-
http://www.bodybio.com/BodyBio/docs/BodyBioBulletin-4to1Oil.pdf


"To raise fluidity (think energy) of our cell membranes we need those omega 6 (n-6) and omega 3 (n-3) oils, and we need them in the right ratio. However, the ratio between the two essential EFAs is equally difficult since they both use the same enzymes to metabolize their lipid chains to the higher order of fatty acids, the HUFAs. LA and ALA are both 18 carbons long. Both must be elongated (add more carbons) by an elongase enzyme (to 20 and 22 carbons) and 

both must be desaturated by D6D and D5D. LA and ALA use those same enzymes, which places them in competition with

each other, sort of a mini-war as to which will get served.

However, even though they are both the same length of carbons, 18, the omega-3s have an energy advantage over

the 6s. Alpha-linolenic (n-3) has 3 double bonds compared to linoleic (n-6) with 2. The cis-double bonds are the seat

of the energy of PUFAs (and of all life), giving ALA 50% more oomph than LA.



Yehuda: However, before 1993, how much of each of

the EFAs was still unknown. Prior to Bourre, Yehuda and

Carasso from Israel had published an EFA study with

soybean oil, showing signifi cant improvement in learning



capacity (198787), however, the more defi nitive testing

followed in 199388 which zeroed in on the ratio of the 6s

and the 3s. Yehuda, Mostovsky, Carasso, and Rabinowitz

created the most thorough testing regime yet done using

linoleic (omega 6) at seven different ranges, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5,

5, 5.5, and 6, to 1 part linolenic (omega 3), however, the

majority of testing encompassed the four ranges from 3.5

to 5:1. The results covered learning performance, pain

thresholds, and thermoregulation, with later studies on

chemical insult and speed of recovery. Even though the

specifi c mode of action remained unresolved, the tests

conclusively proved the optimum ratio to be 4:1.



Year after year from ’93 on, in study after study, the number

was the same: four parts of linoleic to one part of alpha

linolenic --- 80% linoleic (n-6) to 20% linolenic (n-3).

Yehuda called it SR-3 for Specifi c Ratio-3.



Infancy and aging are two sensitive and critical periods, where

adequate EFA and PUFA bioavailability is crucial



All efforts at healing, of any magnitude, should include an attempt to rebuild the

membrane (or, mem-Brain), which, I should add, is doable

at any age. Please visit our website, www.bodybio.com ---"


Then of note Sarah Myhill comments on the perfect ratio of 3.8 : 1 here

http://www.drmyhill.co.uk/wiki/Brain_fog_-_poor_memory,_difficulty_thinking_clearly_etc


"Brain fats and oils

Humans evolved on the East Coast of Africa eating a diet rich in sea food. It is suggested that the high levels of oils, particularly DHA (Docosahexanoic acid), allowed the brain to develop fast, thus allowing humans to outstrip other mammals. So Homo Sapiens came to have bigger brains allowing intelligence to develop. There is lots of research showing that essential fatty acids are indeed "essential" for normal brain function; so oils that would be helpful in addition to coconut oil would be omega 3 (fish), omega 6 (evening primrose) and omega 9 (olive), together with lecithin (which is phosphatidylcholine – i.e. the main component of all cell membranes).

Oils to treat foggy brain and dementia

A suggested regime to start off would be:


  • Lecithin - one teaspoon (5 ml) twice daily (raw material for basic building blocks of membrane).







  • Coconut oil - one dessertspoonful (10 ml) twice daily (perfect fuel for brain cells).







  • Hemp oil which has the right proportion of omega 6 to 3 (4 to 1) (ensures membranes are of perfect consistency - not too stiff, not too elastic).








See Phospholipid exchange for the correct proportions. Hemp oil is near enough perfect with a ratio of 3.8 to 1 of omega 6 to 3. However there are combinations of other oils one can use in case allergy gets in the way! "

Interesting and very consistent with taking coconut oil internally, too - as well as the importance of Lecithin.

And that Hemp Oil according to Wikipedia also:

"About 30–35% of the weight of hempseed is an edible oil that contains about 80% as essential fatty acids (EFAs); i.e., linoleic acid, omega-6 (LA, 55%), alpha-linolenic acid, omega-3 (ALA, 22%), in addition to gamma-linolenic acid, omega-6 (GLA, 1–4%) and stearidonic acid, omega-3 (SDA, 0–2%).

Interesting that is has some good GLA content as well.

The proportions of linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid in one tablespoon per day (15 ml) of hempseed oil easily provides human daily requirements for EFAs. Unlike flaxseed oil, hempseed oil can be used continuously without developing a deficiency or other imbalance of EFAs. This has been demonstrated in a clinical study, where the daily ingestion of flaxseed oil decreased the endogenous production of GLA"



So what about applying hemp oil topically - it has the two key oils we want in the right ratio?



One web site says:-



"Hemp oil energizes the skin. Moisturizing, regenerating and revitalizing, hemp oil is especially useful for dry, tired or dehydrated skin. Skin regeneration and hydration of dry mature skin are enhanced through the use of hemp oil. It increases the skin elasticity and water retention capacity in tissues.



Atopic dermatitis. Research has discovered that psoriasis is caused by a deficiency of omega 6 fatty acids in the body. Therefore, hemp oil is recommended as a complementary treatment. The fatty acids present in hemp oil help improve skin oxygenation and hydration"

http://www.veria.com/herbs-supplements/hemp-oil-good-for-so-many-things#ixzz2WOnOxVa1



But what is its Oleic Acid content? - It seems to be about 10 - 16%, which is less than grape seed oil

http://nimbinwave.com/facts/guide-to-hemp-seed-oil



and has 6 - 9% palmitic acid...



however, as I've noted palmitoleic acid is the on you really want to kill fungus and is present in the big three of Mink Oil, sea buckthorn oil and macadamia nut oil:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mink_oil

So once you have completed killing any scalp fungus you may want to shift to topical applications of hemp seed oil or grape seed oil to increase the LA and ALA in the sebum..., which is noted at the beginning is critically important to healing key skin conditions.

However - CS and all what do you all think of this:

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/skin/EFA/index.html#lipid_metabolism

"Furthermore, unlike the liver, the skin lacks the enzymatic machinery required for conversion of LA and ALA to their long-chain metabolites. Specifically, there is a deficiency in delta-6 and delta-5 desaturase activity, enzymes that add double bonds to [url=http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/glossary.html#fatty acid]fatty acid[/url] chains, thereby converting LA to gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and ALA to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (9, 10) (see Figure 1). Because of the inability of skin to produce these long-chain metabolites, GLA, AA, EPA, and DHA are also considered essential nutrients for the skin (9).

Although there is no detectable desaturase activity, elongase activity is retained in the epidermis (9, 10). Thus, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA) can be synthesized from GLA in the epidermis when GLA is supplied exogenously. DGLA metabolites are thought to possess anti-inflammatory properties, thus several studies have investigated the effect of topical and dietary supplementation with GLA-rich oils on inflammatory skin conditions (5, 16, 22)."

This however is encouraging, as it is the same message about damage to skin through deficiency in LA:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10617998

"Dietary deficiency of linoleic acid (LA), the major 18-carbon n-6 PUFA in normal epidermis, results in a characteristic scaly skin disorder and excessive epidermal water loss. Because of the inability of normal skin epidermis to desaturate LA to gamma-linolenic acid, it is transformed by epidermal 15-lipoxygenase to mainly 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid, which functionally exerts antiproliferative properties in the tissue. In contrast, compared with LA, arachidonic acid (AA) is a relatively minor 20-carbon n-6 PUFA in the skin and is metabolized via the cyclooxygenase pathway, predominantly to the prostaglandins E(2), F(2)(alpha), and D(2). AA is also metabolized via the 15-lipoxygenase pathway, predominantly to 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. At low concentrations, the prostaglandins function to modulate normal skin physiologic processes, whereas at high concentrations they induce inflammatory processes."

CS - comments ??? 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12510822

And on that?

Some alternative and more positive views on Oleic Acid -
http://www.prosperorganics.com/tag/skin-health/page/2/

My hypothesis is that LA and ALA topical supplementation (providing it is with oils that have a relatively with low Oleic Acid content) is necessary to correct common LA (Omega 6 - C18) deficiencies in the sebum, and done with e.g. Hemp oil may also provide the beneficial advantages of Omega 3 in ALA form. Grape seed, sesame oil and sunflower oil may also be good - but watch out of the Oleic acid content in the latter two if you are concerned with demodex.

http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/313187-demodex-truly-is-the-answer-to-acne-rosacea-etc/

Furthermore, if mixed with say an essential oil in the Prague ratio of 1 drop of essential oil to 5 drops of carrier oil, this may also help rebuild the capilliary network necessary to achieve substantial regrowth. And if you make the essential oil SBT there is your demodex killer in the mix.

What I want to check with CS is what are the inflammatory or anti inflammatory effects of topically applied high content LA and ALA oils - like hemp, grape seed, sesame and sunflower - to the scalp in relation to e.g. Prostaglandins

It is somewhat reassuring that ayurveda has used sesame oil as a vata balancing oil for years.


Last edited by Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 7:52 pm; edited 5 times in total

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:36 pm

More evidence to support this:-

http://www.rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosacea_Forum/showthread.php?23228-Oleic-Acid-vs-Linoleic-Acid-in-Sebum

"I was doing some research on oleic acid in sebum and found that oleic acid is found in sebum that is lacking in linoleic acid (an EFA - Essential Fatty Acid)."

Does this suggest that only when we are low in linoleic acid that our sebum pumps out more oleic acid (demodex builder...)

and,

"So, in summary, if we can eliminate oleic acid on the outside of our bodies by not putting it on our skin, but want to keep it from forming in our own sebum, it all goes back to a healthy diet, which will give us the EFA's that we so desperately need to control seb derm, etc."

Plus:-

http://www.heralopecia.com/interact/showthread.php/14444-More-re-Sebum-control-AGA-related-hairloss

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 7:16 pm

Possible summary:-

1.    Correct all internal EFA deficiencies - especially LA : ALA ratio

2.    Expect topical deficiencies of LA - consider applying hemp seed oil, grapeseed or sesame oil
                      (and increasing your internal ratio of good Omega 6.)

3.    Consider avoiding Oleic acid topically, but you can take it internally - e.g. coconut oil etc.

It would be interesting if we found scalp sebum compensates for low available sebum levels of LA, by increasing Oleic acid in the sebum, which is known to cause or be linked to major scalp and hair problems.... (demodex, malassezia yeasts)

This also goes back to Immortal talking about Parental Essential Oils and how we may have too much of the wrong Omega 6 if you eat bad food, but we may very well be actually deficient in the right Omega 6 with potentially terrible consequences for our skin, scalp and hair - as sufficient Linoleic acid (LA) levels in the sebum are so important....

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 7:24 pm

Of note Mink Oil which I have looked into a lot has the following composition:-

http://www.pureminkoil.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=51&Itemid=62

4 main ingredients - 16%, 16%, 39.5% and 16% respectively: -

- Palmitic acid           (forms occlusive membrane)

- Palmitoleic Acid       (very anti-microbial, like SBT)

- Oleic acid               (moisturizing, softening, anti-inflammatory)

- Linoleic Acid (LA)    (moisturizing, lack of it leads to dry skin, scaling and acne)

So can be good for you if you are not sensitive to the Oleic acid / Demodex/ Rosacea connections.

Al other content is trace except Myristic acid  (moisturizing) at 3.5%

This is interesting as almost all the main ingredients in Mink Oil are moisturizing, but when I put Mink oil on recently when feeling my scalp was sunburned it stung where as Aloe did not.


Last edited by Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 7:55 pm; edited 2 times in total

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 7:44 pm

Lastly, here is a little anecdotal evidence that grapeseed oil can be a good carrier oil and can help hair:-

http://www.livestrong.com/article/257608-how-to-grow-hair-long-with-grape-seed-oil/

and, just in case you think I am banging on about something that you don't need to think about:-

Essential Fatty Acids Overview

The two essential fatty acids which we cannot adequately manufacture within the human body because we lack the enzymes are alpha-linolenic acid (Omega 3 fatty acids) and linoleic acid (Omega 6 fatty acids). 

Oils rich in Omega 6 fatty acids include grapeseed oil, palm kernel oil, evening primrose oil, pumpkin seed oil and sesame oil.  (Immortal's PEO's and includes sunflower and safflower) Generally we think of foods rich in Omega 3 being fish or seafood, but there are some plants, such as hempseed or flax, that are also sources of it...

So how can fatty acids help our skin?

We produce many fatty acids internally that are used throughout our system.  In fact there are only two that we don’t and they are known as the essential fatty acids (EFA).  The EFAs are Omega 3  alpha-linolenic acid and Omega 6 linoleic acid.  We need to nourish our skin from the inside and the outside.  So depending on what we are eating and how well we are taking care of ourselves, hopefully we are producing fatty acids internally.  But we can (and should) also apply them topically to help our skin.

http://www.prosperorganics.com/tag/skin-health/page/2/

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  CausticSymmetry on Sun Jun 16, 2013 8:19 pm

An old study that "sheds" a little light on carrier oils:

Arch Dermatol. 1998 Nov;134(11):1349-52.
Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata.

Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill, Scotland. ad.ormerod@abdn.ac.uk

OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the efficacy of aromatherapy in the treatment of patients with alopecia areata.
DESIGN:
A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of 7 months' duration, with follow-up at 3 and 7 months.
SETTING:
Dermatology outpatient department.
PARTICIPANTS:
Eighty-six patients diagnosed as having alopecia areata.
INTERVENTION:
Eighty-six patients were randomized into 2 groups. The active group massaged essential oils (thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood) in a mixture of carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed) into their scalp daily. The control group used only carrier oils for their massage, also daily.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
Treatment success was evaluated on sequential photographs by 2 dermatologists (I.C.H. and A.D.O.) independently. Similarly, the degree of improvement was measured by 2 methods: a 6-point scale and computerized analysis of traced areas of alopecia.
RESULTS:
Nineteen (44%) of 43 patients in the active group showed improvement compared with 6 (15%) of 41 patients in the control group (P = .008). An alopecia scale was applied by blinded observers on sequential photographs and was shown to be reproducible with good interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.84). The degree of improvement on photographic assessment was significant (P = .05). Demographic analysis showed that the 2 groups were well matched for prognostic factors.
CONCLUSIONS:
The results show aromatherapy to be a safe and effective treatment for alopecia areata. Treatment with these essential oils was significantly more effective than treatment with the carrier oil alone (P = .008 for the primary outcome measure). We also successfully applied an evidence-based method to an alternative therapy.

_________________
My regimen
http://www.immortalhair.org/mpbregimen.htm

Now available for consultation (hair and/or health)
http://www.immortalhair.org/hairconsultation.htm

CausticSymmetry
Admin

Posts: 10646
Join date: 2008-07-09

View user profile http://www.immortalhair.org/

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 8:33 pm

Personal anecdote to help share the importance of what I am saying:-

I have a pretty good head of hair, but it was starting to thin:-

Step 1 - OMG laser - it worked great...

but when my sebum production increased massively and after talking with jdp I reduced the  laser as I started to shed with laser when very high sebum...

Step 2 - then I cut out all cooked OILS (note the stress) and hair loss stopped and I regrew (excess of bad oils anyone?? - NOTE THE LINK)

but I had been exposed to black mold and had an itchy scalp, which Will Gaunitz kindly diagnosed as a really bad scalp fungus... still the hair stuck around, as I...

Step 3 - trained hard & used ocean water to contain the fungus... and deliver nutrients to the hair

while, at first this worked great (massive regrowth), but can you see the long term drying affects on the scalp from the salt... which led to thinning again

Step 4  - I was recommended to apply mink oil - very moisturizing, maybe I should have done...!

and, after a while the sea water also lost it's effectiveness against the fungus...

Step 5 - Move to 8,000 feet up in the mountains where there is no humidity and apply some topical formulations from Gaunitz designed to be anti fungal - this worked - NO MORE FUNGUS 

BUT, and a big but, the dryness exacerbated the underlying dryness (caused by long term EFA deficiency and the salt water)

- so while I had no hair loss sleeping, or inside or in the shower or on my comb - but on a hot windy day the dryness would increase and shed some more.

- which would seem to indicate that killing the fungus was beneficial - no loss in many ways - without correcting the EFA deficiencies and increasing EFA topically to compensate for the dryness on the scalp I would still be going backwards...

So my STEP 6 & 7 is to

6 - correct the EFA deficiency, especially Omega 6, and

7 - increase Linoleic Acid in the sebum, by topical applications to the scalp to change the sebum concentrations while also seeking to moisturize, repair and rebuild damaged/ dry fat layers and skin cells in the scalp.

and then 8 - keep up a diet and environmental regime that does not retrigger the fungus...

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:01 pm

CausticSymmetry wrote:An old study that "sheds" a little light on carrier oils:

Arch Dermatol. 1998 Nov;134(11):1349-52.
Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata.

Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill, Scotland. ad.ormerod@abdn.ac.uk

OBJECTIVE:
To investigate the efficacy of aromatherapy in the treatment of patients with alopecia areata.
DESIGN:
A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of 7 months' duration, with follow-up at 3 and 7 months.
SETTING:
Dermatology outpatient department.
PARTICIPANTS:
Eighty-six patients diagnosed as having alopecia areata.
INTERVENTION:
Eighty-six patients were randomized into 2 groups. The active group massaged essential oils (thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood) in a mixture of carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed) into their scalp daily. The control group used only carrier oils for their massage, also daily.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
Treatment success was evaluated on sequential photographs by 2 dermatologists (I.C.H. and A.D.O.) independently. Similarly, the degree of improvement was measured by 2 methods: a 6-point scale and computerized analysis of traced areas of alopecia.
RESULTS:
Nineteen (44%) of 43 patients in the active group showed improvement compared with 6 (15%) of 41 patients in the control group (P = .008). An alopecia scale was applied by blinded observers on sequential photographs and was shown to be reproducible with good interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.84). The degree of improvement on photographic assessment was significant (P = .05). Demographic analysis showed that the 2 groups were well matched for prognostic factors.
CONCLUSIONS:
The results show aromatherapy to be a safe and effective treatment for alopecia areata. Treatment with these essential oils was significantly more effective than treatment with the carrier oil alone (P = .008 for the primary outcome measure). We also successfully applied an evidence-based method to an alternative therapy.


Great post Immortal.

Do you also see how it also corroborates what we have discussed before, in that the low oleic acid content in grapeseed oil may have been a reason for the success. I'd be interested to see if the jojoba oil carrier was as or less successful as the grapeseed oil carrier.




Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:05 pm


Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:05 pm

CS over to you - can you tell us if you agree with all of the above chart?

and, of course, Parental Essential Oil

http://www.brianpeskin.com/

http://www.brianpeskin.com/BP.com/about/PeskinPrimer.pdf


"What is a Parent Essential Oil (PEO)?



There are only two (2) essential fatty acids, LA (parent omega-6) and

ALA (parent omega-3). They MUST come from food. To work properly,

they MUST be NOT heated, chemically unprocessed, organically raised

and processed to guarantee full physiologic functionality. Fast foods

use adulterated, non-functional EFAs that can no longer be termed a fully

functional parent essential oils. All other EFAs excluding ALA and LA

are correctly termed EFA “derivatives.” This includes the most common

derivatives such as AA, DHA, EPA, etc. What is not understood by most

physicians is that derivatives are made in the body, from the parent EFAs,

on an “as needed” basis in extremely limited quantities. Consumption



of derivatives from food is therefore not necessary, yet fish oil consists



entirely of DHA and EPA in supra-pharmacological OVERDOSES, thereby

overdosing the patient and causing damage instead of health. Few, if any,

physicians ask to see the “normal standard” values of physiologic DHA/

EPA amounts in tissue and plasma compared to the parent PEO amounts

in tissue and plasma. When they discover the truth of how little DHA and

EPA there should be in relation to how much they’ve been administering,

physicians are shocked and dismayed that they have been (unknowingly)

harming their patients, and wish to correct their recommendation to Peskin



Protocol PEOs (as per the above physician testimonials). Peskin Protocol





PEOs are a (patent-pending) plant-based proprietary formulation unlike



any in the world and can be obtained organically from precise mixtures



of sunflower, safflower, pumpkin, and evening primrose seed oils and



coconut oil.

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

more form Peskin

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:18 pm

Long-term PEO supplementation in patients presenting with a broad




spectrum of maladies resulted in: 35 subjects, 13 male and 22 female, aged 35-



75. The median age was 62 years old. These volunteers were supplemented




with plant-based essential fatty acids of the Peskin Protocol formulation for



a period of 3 months to 48 months.



The median duration of use was 24 months. Half of the subjects used the




PEO formulation for less than 24 months and half used it for more than



24 months. Twenty-five of the subjects improved their arterial flexibility.



That’s a stunning 73% effectiveness (absolute — not relative). The average






improvement was a 9 year decrease in biological arterial age, making



their effective age younger than their physical age.




The mean (average) arterial (biological) age of the subjects dropped





over 8.8 years — making each of them in effect a younger patient!

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  Mastery on Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:24 pm

Cs - over to you...

and enjoy this...

http://www.brianpeskin.com/BP.com/reports/NotGeneticCAMB.pdf

http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/brian-peskin-and-efas

Mastery

Posts: 622
Join date: 2010-09-26

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  ppm on Mon Jun 17, 2013 12:32 pm

But the Ray Peat-Gang on the other hand
demonises any PUFA and (thus) promotes SFAs instead
which, as is said, would in turn increase the need for PUFAs.
Also the more saturated a FA the more endotoxin it shuttles into the circulation..
Yet they are not dead yet, and also claim a good effect on hair..

Also olive oil is used on skin but it's ~90% oleic acid, with in fact no LNA.

ppm

Posts: 164
Join date: 2009-07-24

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  DeadlyDevice on Mon Jun 17, 2013 4:44 pm

I'd like to see some legit studies showing the need for any kind of PUFA.

I eat mostly saturated with less than 8 grams PUFA per day. I don't miss the damn sardines, and sure as hell don't miss that awful vegetable oil. Cooking everything on butter. I only eat 1 brazil nut per day for the selenium.

I think Peat is right about PUFA, they are the biggest change in the human diet in the last 50 years and coincide with the increase of so many diseases.

The whole concept of "Essential Fatty Acids" is a fraud. When you look into the story behind how EFA's were 'proven', it's ridiculous, flawed science.

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/fats-degeneration3.shtml

I'd invite anyone to read the first few paragraphs of this article, it tells the story way better than I can.

It's very hard to be "PUFA-deficient" unless you're on a purified laboratory diet. You can't completely avoid them if you try. So what's the point of going out of your way to eat more? The human body is mostly saturated anyway, I think it knows better what kind of fats it needs than shill doctors and corrupt scientists.

DeadlyDevice

Posts: 261
Join date: 2012-12-17

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Deficiency in sebum of EFA linked to scalp and hair loss problems

Post  4039 on Mon Jun 17, 2013 11:09 pm

It's not as simplistic or one-sided as Mr. Peat thinks.


"With the fatty acid lecithin present, the melting point of cholesterol (298.4°F) is reduced to 180° F ... But when the essential fatty acids linoleic and linolenic are in sufficient supply, the melting point of cholesterol comes down to 32° F, well below normal body temperature."

-- How to Fight Cancer and Win by William L. Fischer


"Changes in the ability to empty the gallbladder and physical composition of bile are the most consistent age-related changes. Bertolini (1969) found that bile tends to be thicker, richer in cholesterol and reduced in volume in the elderly. Statistics indicate an increase in the incidence of gallstones with age. Glen (1981) reported that 25 to 30 percent of those aged 50 to 60, and 55 percent of those over 80 had gallstones, compared to only 10 percent of people  younger than 30."

-- Human Aging and Chronic Disease by Cary Steven Kart, Eileen K. Metress, Seamus P. Metress

4039

Posts: 523
Join date: 2010-08-21

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 2 1, 2  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum