Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

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Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  bobthebuilder on Tue Dec 03, 2013 2:06 pm

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006291X85716701

"Minoxidil, a potent antihypertensive agent and hair growth stimulator, is metabolized by phenol sulfotransferase to its activated form, minoxidil sulfate. The thermostable form of phenol sulfotransferase was reported to be the enzyme that catalyzed the reaction. Our previous findings with partially purified human platelet preparations indicated that the thermolabile form of phenol sulfotransferase also catalyzed the sulfation of minoxidil. To confirm and to characterize precisely the activity of thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase toward minoxidil, we investigated the ability of the enzyme expressed from a human liver cDNA clone to sulfate minoxidil during testing of thermal stability and of inhibition by 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol and NaCl. The cDNA encoded thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase activity assayed with minoxidil behaved in the same fashion as the activity measured with dopamine, a finding that confirmed that this enzyme activity sulfated minoxidil. Thus, thermolabile phenol sulfotransferase must be taken into account with the thermostable enzyme when estimating the human tissue sulfotransferase contribution to minoxidil sulfation."

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/alan-j-bauman/hair-loss-treatment_b_3039650.html

"Studies suggest that a patient has to have an active enzyme called "sulfotransferase" in order for their hair follicles to respond to minoxidil treatments. It is this enzyme that converts topically applied minoxidil into the active chemical (called minoxidil sulfate) that stimulates the follicles. Not everyone has enough sulfotransferase to "activate" minoxidil. There may be other biological roadblocks too -- like inflammation at or around hair follicles in the scalp and other factors, which can also affect minoxidil's action. The bottom line for patients is that there's a 65 per cent chance that standard over-the-counter minoxidil won't help you. Instead, you may require a prescription for a specially formulated, compounded minoxidil solution for optimal results. A new "minoxidil sensitivity' test will be out soon in the US, which can pre-determine if a patient is likely to respond to standard over-the-counter minoxidil before they start the treatment."

http://healthyawareness.com/thread-supplementing-sulfates-msm-and-autism

"Willis: To increase sulfate levels, certain sulfate containing substances may be ingested, such as glucosamine sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and minerals in sulfate form—like zinc sulfate (may irritate sensitive stomachs), iron sulfate, and Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate).

Oral supplementation of sulfates may not be too successful, however. The best way is to take an Epsom salts bath (two cups or more in a tub of hot water). Soak it up through the skin for 20 minutes, and don’t rinse off-and don’t worry if the child drinks some of the water. This bath has been shown to increase sulfur content of the blood up to four times. (Start with less Epsom salts and a shorter bathtime to make sure the bath is tolerated.)"

"Molybdenum

Willis: The efficiency of the available PST enzymes can be enhanced by supplementing molybdenum and histidine. These are needed in the molybdenum-histidine containing enzymes, sulfite oxidase and cysteine dioxygenase that oxidize sulfur. Also important are iron, and the B-complex vitamins (especially niacin).

Oral sulfate or copper tends to deplete molybdenum, so molybdenum must be supplemented along with the sulfates. A coenzyme, vitamin B-complex supplement of moderate potency should be supplemented as well. One mother in supplementing molybdenum reports that her daughter, who was doing quite well, regressed into severe, autistic symptoms for three days, including 18 hours of screaming— possibly due to a detoxifying. Her doctor urged her to cease, but she stayed the course, and today her daughter is far and away better! This is serious stuff.

Incidentally, a gross deficiency of molybdenum manifests as tachycardia, headache, mental disturbances, and coma. An excess intake of 10-15 mg daily (for adults) can cause a gout like syndrome because of an elevated production of uric acid. Dosage range should not exceed 1 mg per day. Very little molybdenum is needed, but it is an important element in several important metalloenzymes (xanthine oxidase, aldehyde oxidase, and sulfite oxidase) that participate in crucial liver detoxification pathways."

"The
first is to increase the amount of sulfate available to it. The
second is to increase the amount of the enzyme so it has an easier
job finding the available sulfate.”-Susan Owens.

Dr. Rosemary Waring’s research shows that the lack of sulfate is the
primary problem in 73% of these children (another study found low
levels in 92%), but all of those Waring checked had a low PST level
too. Similar sulfate deficiencies have been reported in people with
migraine, rheumatoid arthritis, jaundice, and other allergic
conditions all of which are anecdotally reported as common in the
families of people with autism. Adequate sulfoxidation requires
adequate supplies of B-vitamins, especially vitamin B6. The PST
enzymes are inhibited or overloaded by chocolate, bananas, orange
juice, vanillin, and food colorants such as tartrazine. Removal of
these from the diet and supplementation of sulfates may well relieve
all these symptoms. The lack of sulfation could well be due to the
largely carbohydrate diet of most of these children. It is likely a
combination of all these things. In any case, toxic compounds of
these aforementioned chemicals can build to dangerous levels. A high
value for the tIAG (?) as well as a high reading for DHPPA (rather
HPHPA-a phenolic metabolite of tyrosine) both indicate a PST problem.

Unfortunately, a lack of sulfated gags in the kidneys will allow loss
of these sulfates. There is often found low plasma sulfate and high
urine sulfate and high urinary thiosulfate as if the kidneys are not
able to retain (recycle) sulfate. This needed retention requires the
work of a transporter that has been found in “in vitro” studies to be
blocked almost completely by mercury and by excess chromium (but not
as thoroughly). One study found urinary sulfite to be elevated due to
a lack of molybdenum in 36%. Supplementing moly showed improvements
in clinical symptoms. Sugar increases the amounts of calcium,
oxalate, uric acid, and glucosaminoglycans being wasted in the urine.

Dr. Waring found that 92% of autistic children seem to be wasting
sulfate in the urine; for blood plasma levels are typically low and
urinary levels are high. There is also an abnormal cysteine to
sulfate ratio. Cysteine is the amino acid that should be used to make
sulfate, so it appears that the sulfate is probably being utilized
far faster than the cysteine can be converted, leaving a deficit of
sulfate (sugar wastes it), or the cysteine is not being metabolized
to sulfate.

Supplementation of vitamin B2, B6, B12, folic acid,
magnesium, and TMG may normalize metabolism of methionine into
cysteine, but vitamin C is needed to prevent cysteine (which
contributes its sulfur more readily) from converting to cystine, its
oxidized form.

Supplementing taurine, the
sulfur containing amino-acid that is at the end of the metabolic
chain, has been helpful in meeting this need for taurine; and, being
the immediate precursor, may supply needed sulfates. Taurine is
reported to have an anti-opioid effect (Braverman 1987).
The excess-cysteine/low-sulfate condition that Waring observed may be
because of a deficiency of the amino acid histidine that can be run
low by seasonal allergies and the medications taken to treat them.
Metal toxicities, common in these kids, can run it low.

The gut sheds sulfated glucosaminoglycans during inflammation which
could account for the low levels there and the high levels in urine.
This leads to a “Leaky Gut” condition, and to the excess opioid
problem. Not only do macrophages (scavenging white blood cells) eat
GAGs and release inorganic sulfate, there is a transporter the
intestines use to absorb sulfate from the diet, called the DRA
transporter. Its levels will decrease five-to-seven fold when the gut
is inflamed. That would make it extremely difficult to absorb
adequate sulfate from food or from oral supplements. The problem is a
nutritional one, but it is not one easily solved by oral
supplementation of a missing substance. The gut must be healed.

Those lacking
in sulfite oxidase cannot metabolize MSM, or the sulfite used in
Chinese foods or on some green salads, to sulfate, and may get
headache, dizziness, fatigue, wheezing, leg pain, and other symptoms.
MSM also seems to cause hair loss when there is heavy metals
poisoning, particularly mercury. This may be overcome by
supplementing molybdenum and vitamin B6, and this will enable more
efficient metabolism in this pathway relieving the sensitivity to
sulfur-bearing foods, and producing needed sulfates. Many cannot
tolerate more than 500 mg MSM, yet show very positive benefits from
even this amount. So, start low and increase dosage as you can
tolerate it. Always supplement molybdenum when taking MSM. Two
hundred to 300 mcg a day may be enough, but moly absorbs poorly, and
adults may require 1000 mcg twice daily for three or four months or
longer to overcome this aversion to sulfur-bearing foods."


--------------------------

Is this why the famous MSM, Fin, Minox combo works well for hair loss.
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Re: Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  Biffy on Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:46 pm

Great post thanks. My question to you would be why does oral Minoxidil work way better than topical? For me it could possibly mean you can naturally replicate Minoxidil results by balancing your blood sugar levels...

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Re: Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  iuyyighghghgkh on Tue Apr 21, 2015 4:47 am

Biffy wrote:Great post thanks. My question to you would be why does oral Minoxidil work way better than topical? For me it could possibly mean you can naturally replicate Minoxidil results by balancing your blood sugar levels...

minoxidil replacements :

oral : apple polyphenols



topical :

solban by idealabs , niacin, caffeine, aspirin


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Re: Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  Nanas on Tue Apr 21, 2015 6:50 am

how do you know its about internal and not topical??

grape seed extract is mainly used topically for hair growth.

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Re: Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  iuyyighghghgkh on Tue Apr 21, 2015 7:05 am

Nanas wrote:how do you know its about internal and not topical??

grape seed extract is mainly used topically for hair growth.

is it ?

oral apple polyphenols work too/grape seed extract

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The only form of minoxidil that has worked for me is minoxidil sulfate.

Post  Kelly305 on Thu Jan 05, 2017 10:50 am

Thanks for the very informative post. It was a great read, very interesting.

I also read that regular Minoxidil doesn't work on some individuals because they lack a certain naturally produced enzyme on their scalp/skin, & therefore, they will never see any results.

The only form of minoxidil that has worked for me is a minoxidil sulfate 5% topical.

I tried every type of regular minoxidil topical & never achieved any results.

Could it possibly be that "Minoxidil Sulfate 5%" takes care of this problem because whether or not the individual has this "enzyme" it will work regardless?

I can't speak for anyone else, but minoxidil Sulfate has been a God send for me.

I also add a little DMSO to my minoxidil sulfate.

I can even see new hairs that are growing well below my normal hairline (about an inch to an inch & a half). So much so, that sometimes I have to pluck them because they are growing too low below my hairline.

But, that could also be because sometimes I'm in a rush and do not properly wash and minoxidil Sulfate that drips down my forehead.

I should try applying it to the back of my hand as an experiment to see if I grow hair there,lol.
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Re: Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  Seuxin on Fri Jan 06, 2017 1:34 am

So...how we have to do to increase minoxidil effectivnesss ?

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Re: Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  Seuxin on Fri Jan 06, 2017 1:35 am

So...how we have to do to increase minoxidil effectivnesss ?

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Increase effectiveness of Minoxidil Sulfate

Post  Kelly305 on Fri Jan 06, 2017 3:28 am

I found that adding some DMSO to my 5% minoxidil sulfate I use gives a very very slight tingling sensation, which I read can help increase absorption.

Also, the 5% minoxidil sulfate brand that I am currently using also comes with retinol already added in it.

Here are some Pubmed studies regarding the benefit of adding retinol to minoxidil:

I'm not allowed to post the study links, but if you google minoxidil and retinol and pubmed, there are some really intriguing articles.

It's been working good for me (pretty much the only topical that ever gave me results).

My cousin also just started using the same regimen only 3 and a half weeks ago & is starting to see results.
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Re: Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  Seuxin on Tue Jan 10, 2017 3:05 am

Tretinoin improve minoxidil effectivness. It's proven.
I don't think adding DMSO in minoxidil is a good thing because DMSO is really too penetrant, i think the minoxidil will go too systemic !

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Tretinoin

Post  Kelly305 on Wed Jan 11, 2017 2:21 am

Thanks for the advice.

Do you use that with regular minoxidil or minoxidil sulfate (which I currently use, it's working great, better than any regular form of minoxidil I ever tried, and I HAVE TRIED THEM ALL)?

Yes the DMSO can be an irritant, that's why I add very little to my 5% minoxidil sulfate.

The minoxidil sulfate I buy also comes with retinol in the formulation.

Is Tretinoin the same as Retinol? I think I may have read that somewhere (don't quote me on that,lol)

Thanks.
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The importance of Sulfate

Post  Kelly305 on Wed Jan 18, 2017 1:41 am


The more and more I keep reading about minoxidil, it seems that sulfate plays a big role in actually making minoxidil effective.

I read on another post, on a different site that:

"Some people aren't able to convert minoxidil into the active chemical minoxidil sulfate, the claim is that these are the non-responding people to minoxidil because they lack the enzyme that converts it."

Would anyone know if a regular dermatologist would be able to test my scalp for these naturally occurring enzymes.

Because I have tried every brand of regular minoxidil, and the only results I was ever able to achieve was by using a 5% minoxidil sulfate topical.

Thanks in advance for any input or thoughts.
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Re: Why Minoxidil might not work - pheno sulfotransferase

Post  long hair on Wed Jan 18, 2017 6:54 pm

is it possible that minox sulfate just react with calcium phosphate {calcification} and dissolve it Shocked ? do you feel your scalp is less hard as your hair regrow ?
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Minoxidil Sulfate

Post  Kelly305 on Sat Jan 21, 2017 11:05 am

is it possible that minox sulfate just react with calcium phosphate {calcification} and dissolve it Shocked ? do you feel your scalp is less hard as your hair regrow ?

I'm not too sure what you mean, but my scalp feels the same as before I started using minoxidil sulfate.

The only I notice is a very slight tingling when I apply a lot after a shower. This might be bc the brand of minoxdil sulfate I buy has retinol added or bc I add a little DMSO for absorption. The tingling last a couple minutes then my scalp feels normal.

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